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Mobile Cuisine is the complete online resource destination for the mobile food industry. We are dedicated to delivering our faithful readers every must-read street food, food truck, food cart and food stand story bubbling up across the Web, along with exclusive news, interviews, and amazing photos.

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kitchener Food Trucks

KITCHNER, ONTARIO - The controversy over new rules for food truck operators in Kitchener is heating up as a city committee considers them next week.

While council won’t decide on the proposed set of rules until May, at least one food truck operator says she’s finding the new rules hard to stomach.

At issue is a new a licensing fee of almost $2,000, plus a $150 event fee for every time trucks would set up for special Thursday night events downtown.

Previously, city staff had proposed food trucks be set up between 200 to 400 metres from existing restaurants. In the new proposed rules, that limit would shrink to 30 metres.

Andrea Kim and her husband Christopher started selling Korean food from their truck, West of Seoul, in September of 2013. She says the new rules would affect her bottom line and ultimately, the ability to operate her business in Kitchener.

“The fee is not only unreasonable in comparison to the fees of neighbouring cities, but it’s unreasonable just because of the type of access we’re being given,” Kim said.

She and her husband have already bought a license to operate in Hamilton, which only cost them about $300 by comparison.

Proposed new food truck rules

Food trucks will still be licensed as special events in Kitchener under modified rules proposed by city staff.  Council had previously considered rules at the end of February, until a motion by Coun. Berry Vrbanovic sent staff back to the drawing board.

Here’s what is included in the new rules being voted on Tuesday:

  • Food trucks will be able to operate in ?McLennan Park, Huron Natural Area, Budd Park and Southwest Optimist Park, as well as Huron Business Park.
  • Trucks must be set back at least 30 metres from businesses and 90 metres from schools, unless permission is given by the business or school to decrease that distance.
  • Trucks are prohibited downtown unless they’re part of special events and festivals, Monday lunch hours at city hall, Thursdays between 4:00 -10:00 p.m. at pre-determined locations, or one-off promotional events between businesses and the food trucks.
  • Trucks would also be permitted downtown as part of a pilot program in the Civic District which would see between one to three trucks operate one evening a week.
  • A food truck license to allow operators to set up on public and private property would cost $1,947, plus $150 per event fee. A license to operate on private property only would cost $1,051.

Find the entire article at cbc.ca <here>

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columbia mo food truck

COLUMBIA, MO - At its meeting Monday night, the Columbia City Council approved ordinances to authorize food truck zones on certain downtown streets and to extend the hours that restaurants are allowed to serve alcohol at sidewalk cafes.

After the passage of the ordinances, food trucks will be able to set up shop at eight on-street parking spaces on the south side of Cherry Street between Sixth and Seventh streets, eight spaces on the south side of Locust Street between Ninth and Tenth streets, and 10 spaces on the north side of Walnut Street between Ninth and Tenth.

To use the zones, food truck operators need to pay for the parking spaces they use by leasing meter bags from the city’s Public Works Department. Daily bags cost $10 for one space and $20 for two spaces, and monthly bags cost $150 for one space and $200 for two spaces.

Before passage of the food truck ordinance, food trucks were mostly limited to private parking lots.

Bryan Maness, owner of the Ozark Mountain Biscuit Co., testified before the council and asked it to amend the proposed ordinance to allow food trucks to park on city streets on the University of Missouri campus. Campus is predominantly zoned R-3 residential, and the ordinance the council passed does not allow food trucks in residential areas.

Council members indicated they might be open to adjusting food truck zones later, but Mayor Bob McDavid said the city should get the university’s input on the issue of allowing the trucks on campus before amending the ordinance.

“I think we should explore that,” McDavid said.

Find the entire article at columbiatribune.com <here>

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deland fl downtown

DELAND, FL - Food-truck vendors looking to operate on private property in DeLand will have to jump through a few new hoops before they can open their serving windows to hungry customers.

An ordinance requiring trucks and the sites which host them to get permits from the city passed 4-0 — with Commissioner Vonzelle Johnson absent — on second reading at Monday’s meeting of the City Commission.

Several commissioners had previously expressed concern that food trucks parked long-term in vacant lots were acting as de facto restaurants and competing with the town’s brick-and-mortar eateries.

The ordinance requires each food truck “host site” to get an annual license from the city.

Each site would be allowed to have food trucks up to 12 times each year.

The food trucks themselves will be required to undergo an annual fire safety inspection, as well as obtain a business tax receipt if based in the city.

The new rules wouldn’t apply to food trucks operating in the city as part of a special event.

While the idea for the ordinance was first brought up last summer, protracted negotiations with private land owners who would have been affected delayed its adoption.

Find the entire article by news-journalonline.com <here>

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Rick Bayless Food Truck Quote

“A food truck is a great way for a young chef to get their food and business out there to FOCUS on the food.” – Rick Bayless

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follow-your-nola-food truck

After years of fighting and preventing food trucks from operating on the streets of their own city, NOLA recruits a food truck to travel the country and invite tourists to visit the Crescent City.

NEW ORLEANS, LA - The New Orleans Tourism Marketing Corporation (NOTMC) summer ad campaign offers even more reasons to travel to the ‘Crescent City’ in 2014. The additions include an event activation, more robust paid advertising, and an enhanced website that will engage the experiential traveler.

“There are endless options available today to engage visitors and prospective visitors and we intend to engage as many as possible in our quest to encourage experiencing our city,” said Mark Romig, President and CEO of New Orleans Tourism Marketing Corporation (NOTMC). “By using the tools in our “Follow Your NOLA” campaign, people will experience and interact with New Orleans in a very personal way.”

A “Follow Your NOLA” food truck will premiere food, prizes, and fun at Jazz Fest, then hit the road, traveling to three cities in Texas, including Houston, Austin, and Dallas. Locals and visitors will be able to follow along on Twitter, via #followyournola on @visitNewOrleans.

Besides tasting authentic New Orleans food prepared by Chef Brian Landry, a spinning compass will award prizes with every turn, such as cultural experiences including live music and a Mardi Gras Indian; “Follow Your NOLA” gifts; and even a chance to win a trip to New Orleans. Twitter users can also enter into the sweepstakes by using the hashtag, #TasteOfNOLA on @visitNewOrleans.

“Sending our “Follow Your NOLA” food truck throughout Texas will remind our neighbors that they are just a short drive away,” continued Romig, “It is a rolling advertisement that should generate enough interest to keep New Orleans top of mind and encourage those who see it to plan their own personal trip on our website.”

Joining the food truck activation, beginning today, a paid media campaign will launch with fifteen and thirty-second spots featuring the voice of New Orleans actor John Goodman, who has a deep passion and love for New Orleans, as well as the soundtrack of Professor Longhair’s iconic song, “Big Chief.” The commercials are targeted toward key ‘fly markets’ with non-stop service to Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport as well as regional ‘drive markets’ via broadcast television, national cable, and digital video.

Additionally, the campaign will be promoted via a national integrated digital media campaign on partners such as Afar, Bon Appetit, Buzzfeed, The Huffington Post, Garden & Gun, and Pandora.

Targeted fly markets include Atlanta, GA; Austin, TX; Baltimore, MD; Boston, MA; Chicago, IL; Cincinnati, OH; Nashville, TN; Kansas City, KS; San Francisco, CA; and St. Louis. MO. Drive markets include Baton Rouge, Monroe, Lafayette, and Shreveport, LA; Columbus, MS; Houston, TX; Memphis, TN; Mobile and Montgomery, AL; and Pensacola, FL.

“The New Orleans experience is what attracts people to our city and keeps them coming back. This campaign has all of the touch points that highlight our culture and we can’t wait to see the reaction of our friends and neighbors in Texas when we bring great food, music and cultural experiences to them with the “Follow Your NOLA” food truck,” said Stephen Perry, President and CEO of the New Orleans Convention and Visitors Bureau. “Visiting New Orleans in the summer is a great value with festivals nearly every weekend and plenty to see and do.”

The “Follow Your NOLA.com” website includes a new feature allowing lovers of New Orleans to build a personal travel experience by creating a map-based itinerary. Or users can experience the city following in the footsteps of favorite celebrities, who have posted their favorite haunts in New Orleans. Musician Irvin Mayfield, and artist Terrance Osborne signed on, as well as famous chefs Emeril Lagasse and Anthony Bourdain, and New Orleans Pelican’s basketball star Anthony Davis, among others.

The campaign is also being promoted on New Orleans’ official social media channels via Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, Twitter, Google+ and the GoNOLA.com culture blog. Join and follow the campaign at followyournola.com, NewOrleansOnline.com, or via hashtag #followyournola and #TasteOfNOLA.

The campaign was created by digital marketing agency 360i in collaboration with NOTMC.

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charlotte food truck event

When government steps in to try to fix something that isn’t broken, they have a tendency of making things worse…in this case it looks like government wants to break the food trucks of Charlotte.

CHARLOTTE, NC - Charlotte food truck vendors are protesting proposed city regulations that they say would hurt their industry, which has grown increasingly popular in recent years.

One of the possible changes they’re most concerned about is a rule that would prevent food trucks from operating within 100 feet of a restaurant, nightclub or bar – which would make uptown operations a challenge. They also would face tougher restrictions in residential areas.

Some of the rules under consideration are designed to make it easier for the vendors, including new permitting requirements.

“I don’t think they’re intentionally trying to harm food trucks by any stretch of the imagination,” said David Stuck, who co-founded The Tin Kitchen, a food truck and catering company, in 2012. “But I do think they don’t understand what it is we do.”

There are more than 60 food trucks operating in Charlotte, offering everything from cupcakes to fajitas to grilled cheese, and employing hundreds. More than a dozen consistently gather for weekly Food Truck Friday in South End.

The owners say they got involved in a citizen advisory group hoping that their input would help the city understand what food truck operators need to thrive. But a Charlotte-Mecklenburg Planning Department draft proposal wasn’t what they expected.

Planning Manager Katrina Young, who’s been leading the citizen advisory meetings, says nothing in the proposed draft is permanent and that it’s meant to open a dialogue.

Many food trucks work with local craft breweries that don’t serve food, which is mutually beneficial. That wouldn’t be allowed under the proposal, but Young said that may need to be re-evaluated.

Also at risk would be bringing food trucks to events such as birthday parties and weddings in residential areas. A number of food trucks, including Stuck’s Tin Kitchen, get nearly half their business from such events.

Operators, fearing that proposed changes could permanently alter their business models, are responding with an online petition posted to the newly formed Charlotte Food Truck Association’s website – www. charlottefoodtrucks.org.

Find the entire article at charlotteobserver.com <here>

 

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Andrew Zimmern Food Truck Quote

“The only restaurants that should be worried about food trucks are bad ones,” - Andrew Zimmern

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cullman al map

CULLMAN, AL - From his perch in south Cullman at the corner of Lowe’s parking lot, Duane Coucke has spent the past year carving out his own niche in the burgeoning local food truck business.

As owner of Dewey’s Cajun Shack, he spent the early days making stops at a few different locations but has now settled in permanently at Lowe’s thanks to an agreement with the company and a steady stream of south side patrons in search of po’ boys and seafood plates.

With the City of Cullman now eyeing its first-ever food truck ordinance to establish some ground rules for the upstart vendors within the city, Coucke said he’s interested to see how the proposal works and the impact it could have to grow — or hurt — the industry.

“The food truck business is alive and well in larger metros, and it’s something that gives people a chance to experience other cultures through food,” he said. “That part, I think, is really good for Cullman. It’s a great thing if you’re able to get somebody in who is authentic Cajun or Mexican or Italian food. Sometimes you can have some people with great ideas who can really give the people of Cullman something different.”

After watching nearby cities like Birmingham run into headaches with the finer points of their ordinances in recent months, city leaders say they’re looking at several food truck guidelines to draft an ordinance that takes the better elements from regional cities to hopefully create a market that will benefit business owners and residents alike.

“We’re really just having an open discussion to see which ideas will work and what doesn’t so we can try to come up with a system that’s really fair,” city council member Clint Hollingsworth said. “Figuring out the locations will be critical, and finding ways to avoid traffic and safety issues.”

The council introduced a draft of the “Cullman Mobile Food Vendors Ordinance” earlier this week but tabled it to allow some additional tweaks before it is formally introduced for consideration.

A handful of food trucks are already operating successfully in Cullman, and Hollingsworth said the plans for a formal ordinance were born out of requests from potential vendors wanting more information about the area before they commit to launch a truck or expand service to the city.

“We’ve had people come to us who are in the business and those looking to invest in it, so it’s something we wanted to look at,” he said.

If executed well, Hollingsworth said he believes a formal ordinance — and hopefully the vendors it might bring — could be a worthwhile addition to downtown.

Find the entire article at cullmantimes.com <here>

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Food Truck News

In our quest to keep our readers up to date with the latest stories relating to the food truck industry we have compiled a list of the stories that hit the wire this past weekend from Birmingham, St Louis, Madison, and Sacramento.

April 18

Food truck project could evolve into “food Incubator” for downtown – BIRMINGHAM, AL - The Tillman Levenson Annex was purchased and renovated last year to be a commissary and kitchen space for the Fresh Off the Bun food truck.

Brad Wardlaw, principal at SAS Architects helped to purchase the building for his wife, who owns the Birmingham food truck business.

Find the entire article <here>

The sun’s out, where are the St. Louis food trucks? – ST LOUIS, MO - Spring’s here, fish fries are winding down and our stomachs are grumbling. So when does food truck season officially start? And where can you find some of that delicious grub? We’ve got the rundown.

Find the entire article <here>

April 19

Madison selectmen to hold discussion on food trucks as opposition mounts – MADISON, CT - After initially bringing up the subject last summer, town officials seem to be getting set to take action on proposed rules by which, if passed, food truck vendors must abide.

The vendors have been a talking point in Madison, and the town is holding a public discussion on a draft of the rules later this month.

Find the entire article <here>

April 20

Sacramento’s food truck movement – SACRAMENTO, CA - Sacramento’s appetite for mobile food was fueled three years ago with the debut of SactoMoFo, a festival that rounds up popular food trucks from Northern California. The event has continually drawn thousands in search of mobile munchies who are willing to brave epic lines, while a series of weekly SactoMoFo events feeds Sacramento’s suburbs and business parks.

Find the entire article <here>

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