Which is your Favorite Mobile Food Truck Tracking Application?

Which is your Favorite Mobile Food Truck Tracking Application?

Eating from mobile trucks around the country has become a new way of life of many foodies across the country. The hardest part to indulging in this new trend is actually finding a truck that is near you. If you are a frequent traveler as I am, it can become difficult to track down a truck you would like to try out, even if you happen to follow them on Twitter.

Having a simple one or two step process to find a food truck in your area has become much easier if you happen to own a smart phone.

Using Twitter feeds, GPS and truck-reported location data, several smartphone applications are aiming to even the reliability playing field by plotting gourmet food trucks on mobile maps. None of them have developed a completely accurate system, but depending on where you live, these three apps will give you a much better shot at tracking down your favorite mobile meals.

Eat St.

Food Network’s Eat St. show highlights the most innovative mobile cuisine in North America. Its free iPhone and Android apps are attempting to help viewers track down gourmet meals on wheels near them.

With somewhat of a different approach than most of the food-tracking apps on the market, Eat St. allows food truck owners to update their own locations, menus, hours and profiles. Other food trucks can be added by users, but their profiles remain barren and their locations dubious.

“We’re devoted to finding new ways to keep locations accurate and are constantly improving,” reads the current app description. “In the meantime, the most accurate cities are those with mostly stationary food carts. L.A., New York, Miami and San Francisco have mainly roaming food carts and while the database has grown, it’s best to get location from the carts’ Twitter feed.”

These limitations aren’t unlike those of most food truck tracking apps — Eat St. just seems to be more honest about them.

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Richard is an architect by degree (Lawrence Technological University, Southfield, Michigan) who began his career in real estate development and architectural planning. In September of 2010 he created Mobile Cuisine Magazine to fill an information void he found when he began researching how to start a mobile hotdog cart in Chicago. Richard found that there was no central repository of mobile street food information anywhere on the internet, and with that, the idea for MCM was born.