Minneapolis Food Committee to Meet and Discuss Food Trucks

Minneapolis Food Committee to Meet and Discuss Food Trucks

5 330

MINNEAPOLIS, MN - Are the food trucks that Minneapolis diners seem to love so much causing undo harm to existing restaurant businesses? Are they given an unfair competitive advantage by the state that traditional brick-and-mortars can’t compete against? A group referring to itself as the Downtown Food Committee seems to think so. This Wednesday it will be holding a meeting open to all downtown retailers to discuss the issue.

Anti Food Truck Meeting Flyer
The group is raising the idea of whether food trucks have created a competitive environment in which they are unable to effectively compete and are seeking ways to “improve the food truck ordinance so it works better for the residents, workers, food truck owners, and the restaurant owners in downtown Minneapolis,” according to the flier they put out for Wednesday’s event.

So who is the Downtown Food Committee? The contact guy is D. Brian’s Deli founder Doug Sams, who says he’s not anti-food truck but has voiced frustration over the influx of rolling rivals who don’t have to do things like pay rent.

This is not the first time Skyway restaurateurs have gotten heated over food trucks. Larry Abdo, owner of the MyBurger restaurant,put up signs criticizing the trucks outside his building last month, but was cited for signage violations.

If you attend this meeting, please let us know what happens. You can send confidential emails to admin@mobile-cuisine.com.

 

5 COMMENTS

  1. Oh my god, seriously… these skyway vendors are just taking this way too far. I worked in the main stretch right next to Myburger and D. Brian’s at one point, they were annoying with their complaints then but this is getting ridiculous. I understand that business is affected for them, that it’s harder to compete, but that’s no excuse. Every major food city in the U.S. (and some not-so recognized ones) have a thriving Food Truck Culture, and the restaurants there have to deal with it just as much. If they’re loosing too many customers during the warmer-month Food Truck Season, then they need to buck up and figure out new ways to bring in customers; maybe actually looking into better produce and ingredients for once.
    Calm the heck down, figure things out and stop bitching because you aren’t able to handle the competition. Winter and bad conditions is the main season for Skyway Food Businesses anyways.

    (I apologize if I seemed harsh and angry; I’ve just been really happy and excited ever since our city has started a real Food Truck Movement a few years back, one of the first REAL signs of a True Food Culture in an area, and I think what we need to do is try to SUPPORT and EXPAND this so we can be the real Culinary City that we’ve been working towards all these years.)

Leave a Reply