San Francisco Businesses Hope To Eliminate Ugly Food Trucks

San Francisco Businesses Hope To Eliminate Ugly Food Trucks

Ugly Food Truck

SAN FRANCISCO, CA – A group of outraged San Francisco businesses are putting their time to use by demanding the removal of “ugly and garish” food trucks from their otherwise pristine streets.

Members of the San Francisco Locally Merchants Organization are even criticizing these roaming street vendors as “almost exclusively terrible citizens” and have presented their case before the local Community Zoning Board to help with their crusade.

The co-founder of the organization harshly explained, “They are unsightly, and not particularly good citizens. They litter. They violate the rules frequently. The fact that these are vendors doesn’t give them the license to be slobs.”

To pass the group’s gold standard, food trucks would not be able to have “ugly or garish” vehicle wraps. The organization has pointed to FedEx and UPS as truck branding that could be used as prototypes for what all food trucks should aspire to look like.

Folks behind the popular food truck event Off the Grid, perhaps the people’s voice behind the hungry crowds who actually frequent the cities food trucks, are telling the group to lay off. “…this would make it much less pleasant for us who value these trucks for their delicious, affordable food as an alternative to the generic and overpriced chain restaurants in the area” and credit current vendors as legitimate businesses that employ hundreds of workers across the city.

Attorney Jessie Navarro who advocates for vendors cited the city’s hefty permit fees as very reason why people are unable to spruce up their trucks, “They can’t afford to invest in their mobile businesses and make them look better because they have to pay outrageous fees just to operate” and spurned the group’s proposed cleansing.

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Richard is an architect by degree (Lawrence Technological University, Southfield, Michigan) who began his career in real estate development and architectural planning. In September of 2010 he created Mobile Cuisine Magazine to fill an information void he found when he began researching how to start a mobile hotdog cart in Chicago. Richard found that there was no central repository of mobile street food information anywhere on the internet, and with that, the idea for MCM was born.