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bad interview questions

Working in the mobile food industry is much like any other restaurant industry job which means there can be a lot of turnover. Whether you are new to the industry or just need to fill a recently vacated position, you need to know what cannot be asked when you are involved in the hiring process.

Bad Interview Questions

Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) guidelines, as well as federal and state laws, prohibit asking certain questions of a job applicant, either on the application form or during the interview.

So what are some bad interview questions that you should you stay away from? Basically, you can’t ask about anything not directly related to the job.

13 Bad Interview Questions Or Topics To Avoid
  • Age or date of birth (if interviewing a teenager, you can ask if he or she is 16 years old)
  • Sex, race, creed, color, religion or national origin
  • Disabilities of any kind
  • Date and type of military discharge
  • Marital status
  • Maiden name (for female applicants)
  • If a person is a citizen; however, you can ask if he or she has the legal right to work in the United States

Other questions you should avoid include:

  • How many children do you have? How old are they? Who will care for them while you are at work?
  • Have you ever been treated by a psychologist or psychiatrist?
  • Have you ever been treated for drug addiction or alcoholism?
  • Have you ever been arrested? (You may ask if the person has been convicted if it is accompanied by a statement saying that a conviction will not necessarily disqualify an applicant for employment.)
  • How many days were you sick last year?
  • Have you ever filed for worker’s compensation? Have you ever been injured on the job?

We hope this list helps keep you from getting in trouble for asking bad interview questions to applicants who are interested in working for your food truck business.

RELATED: Post You Food Truck Jobs With Mobile Cuisine

Do you have any additional tips or suggestion? If so, please share them in the comment section below, Tweet us or share them on our Facebook page.

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johnson city downtown

JOHNSON CITY, TN - Leave it alone. That’s Main Street Pizza Company owner Jamie Dove’s solution to the debate over a food truck ordinance in Johnson City.

Tonight’s City Commission meeting is set to include the second reading of a change in an ordinance, which would exclude food trucks in the rule to keep vendors off of public sidewalks and spaces. Dove said he and several other downtown restaurant owners plan to voice their opposition to Johnson City’s Commission’s proposed ordinance that favors food trucks on public land, saying it would negatively affect their businesses that have helped revitalize Johnson City.

Representatives from Numan’s Bar, Frieberg’s Restaurant, the Korean Taco House, Scratch Brick Oven, Taste Budz and more will be on hand at tonight’s public meeting, Dove said. Shop Local and Stable Convergence’s Ted Bradford will also be there. Both he and Dove say tweaking the ordinance has been done without letting existing businesses know what the consequences might be. Dove said he recently made the downtown rounds to discuss the matter with other owners, while remaining open to the idea that he might be in the wrong.

He found a consensus with the other restaurateurs that Johnson City shouldn’t be giving public spaces to food trucks when it could hurt the other tax-paying owners’ ability to generate revenue.

“I’m not anti-food truck by any means — they’re convenient and generate excitement about downtown, but it’s just not fair,” Dove said. “I don’t understand why they need to be given public property to set up and operate on and poach our customers. They should have to come down there and find private property — and it’s down there and there’s a lot of it — and negotiate a lease or a purchase, just like all the rest of us did.”

Citing the much greater amount of garbage that results from operating his stationary restaurant, as well as all the many regulations not applied to the mobile business, Dove said the city is backing something trendy without thinking about the established businesses it could hurt.

Public parking, for example, Dove said is a hot commodity in the downtown area and shouldn’t be given to the mobile businesses who can pull in, poach customers and then pull out. Those spots should be left available as parking options to patrons of established downtown businesses, he said.

Find the entire article at johnsoncitypress.com <here>

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food truck tune up
image credit: vimeo/ Hot Shot's Secret

Food truck tune up intervals vary from one vehicle to another. Most older mobile food trucks with non-electronic ignitions should be tuned every 10,000 to 12,000 miles or every year, whichever comes first.

Newer trucks with electronic ignition and fuel injection systems are scheduled to go from 25,000 miles to as many as 100,000 miles without needing a major tune-up.

food truck tune upRefer to your the truck’s owner manual for recommended tune-up intervals, but be aware that even if it says that the vehicle doesn’t require scheduled tune-ups very often, it’s in your best interest to check periodically that your food truck is working at peak efficiency.

Since food trucks typically do a lot of stop-and-go driving to get to their set up locations and pull heavy loads, your ignition system may need to be tuned more often.

Symptoms that tell you that you need a food truck tune up of your electronic ignition system:
  • The truck stalls a lot. The spark plugs may be fouled or worn, the gap between the spark plug electrodes may need adjusting, or an electronic sensing device may need to be adjusted.If you’re having trouble pinpointing why your vehicle is stalling, you can help your automotive technician diagnose the problem by paying attention to whether the engine stalls when it’s hot or cold or when the air conditioner is on.
  • The engine is running roughly when idling or when you accelerate. Chances are the vehicle needs a tune-up.
  • The truck gets harder to start. The problem can be in the starting system (for example, a weak battery), in the fuel system (for example, a weak fuel pump), or in the ignition system, or can be due to a faulty electronic component, such as the electronic control unit (ECU).

Your food truck is the means to deliver your menu to your customers.

If it breaks down due to over use or a lack of preventative maintenance  your business will suffer until you are able to get it back on the road.

Be sure you use these tips to help determine if you should be getting it to the shop for a tune up to help keep it on the street.

Do you have any tips on how to determine if you need a food truck tune up? If so, please feel free to share them in the comment section below, Tweet us or share them on our Facebook page.

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pork fun facts

The internet is full of fabulous facts about everything from current events to the history basket weaving. Because of this, as we research for our daily content on food trucks, food carts and street food, we stumble upon some items of knowledge that we just did not know.

We have decided when these fun facts pop up, that we would share them with our readers in our section titled “Did You Know?”

For today’s Did You Know we will look at Pork fun facts.

pork fun facts

The Facts: Domestication of pigs took place in China around 7500 BC. China still is the largest producer of pigs.

  • The average American will eat the equivalent of 28 pigs in their lifetime.
  • Pork tenderloin cuts are almost as lean as skinless chicken breasts.
  • December 18th is National Roast Suckling Pig Day.
  • Pork has more protein than chicken and is high in zinc, iron and B-vitamins.
  • At the global level, pork is by far the most widely consumed meat.
  • Pork is the most versatile meat. It can be marinated, roasted, grilled, skewered, dry rubbed, boiled, baked, barbecued, microwaved, pan-fried or stir-fried.
  • During the War of 1812, a packer named Uncle Sam Wilson sent off several hundred barrels of pork for the troops. Each package was labeled ‘U.S.’ and it didn’t take long for ‘Uncle Sam’ to be a household name for the government.
  • Ham is the number one sandwich eaten in U.S. households.
  • In Denmark, there are twice as many pigs as people.

RELATED RECIPE: The Heartstopper Club

Pork Fun Facts We Missed

Please feel free to let us know if we may have missed some pork fun facts in the comment section below. We always love to add to these lists. If we can verify that the facts is just that, a fact, we will give the reader credit in the article.

Reference: Wikipedia: Fun Facts about Pork