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AL

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Waffle House Food Truck

BIRMINGHAM, AL - Earlier this month, Waffle House started bringing plates of joy to disaster stricken areas with a new food truck specialized for disaster relief. The company contracted David Ford of Food Trucks South to create a truck that would not only hold the ambiance and productivity of a brick and mortar location but also could be used to assist areas affected by natural disasters.

The Waffle House food truck will be serving its hashbrowns at the Waffle House Museum’s spring opening on Saturday April, 26.

Here are the details:

Waffle House fans are invited to stop by the museum from noon to 3pm to celebrate the 59-year heritage of this Southern icon. Along with taking tours of the 1955 diner replica, the Waffle House food truck will be onsite to satisfy your hashbrown cravings. This event is free to the public.

Find the event details <here>

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cullman al map

CULLMAN, AL - From his perch in south Cullman at the corner of Lowe’s parking lot, Duane Coucke has spent the past year carving out his own niche in the burgeoning local food truck business.

As owner of Dewey’s Cajun Shack, he spent the early days making stops at a few different locations but has now settled in permanently at Lowe’s thanks to an agreement with the company and a steady stream of south side patrons in search of po’ boys and seafood plates.

With the City of Cullman now eyeing its first-ever food truck ordinance to establish some ground rules for the upstart vendors within the city, Coucke said he’s interested to see how the proposal works and the impact it could have to grow — or hurt — the industry.

“The food truck business is alive and well in larger metros, and it’s something that gives people a chance to experience other cultures through food,” he said. “That part, I think, is really good for Cullman. It’s a great thing if you’re able to get somebody in who is authentic Cajun or Mexican or Italian food. Sometimes you can have some people with great ideas who can really give the people of Cullman something different.”

After watching nearby cities like Birmingham run into headaches with the finer points of their ordinances in recent months, city leaders say they’re looking at several food truck guidelines to draft an ordinance that takes the better elements from regional cities to hopefully create a market that will benefit business owners and residents alike.

“We’re really just having an open discussion to see which ideas will work and what doesn’t so we can try to come up with a system that’s really fair,” city council member Clint Hollingsworth said. “Figuring out the locations will be critical, and finding ways to avoid traffic and safety issues.”

The council introduced a draft of the “Cullman Mobile Food Vendors Ordinance” earlier this week but tabled it to allow some additional tweaks before it is formally introduced for consideration.

A handful of food trucks are already operating successfully in Cullman, and Hollingsworth said the plans for a formal ordinance were born out of requests from potential vendors wanting more information about the area before they commit to launch a truck or expand service to the city.

“We’ve had people come to us who are in the business and those looking to invest in it, so it’s something we wanted to look at,” he said.

If executed well, Hollingsworth said he believes a formal ordinance — and hopefully the vendors it might bring — could be a worthwhile addition to downtown.

Find the entire article at cullmantimes.com <here>

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expect delays signBIRMINGHAM, AL - The Birmingham City Council again delayed a vote on a mobile food vendors ordinance that has been under consideration for nearly a year and a half.

The council voted 8-0 to delay the vote until its Dec. 17 meeting in two weeks. Councilor Lasunda Scales was not present for the vote.

Assistant city attorney Alan Foster told the council members that because of the short Thanksgiving holiday week last week, the city’s legal department needed more time to address all of their legal concerns and to ensure the ordinance is fair to both food truck vendors and brick-and-mortar restaurant owners.

Key ordinance points:

  • Create food zones within the city where food trucks and push carts could set up — either in a permanent location within the city limits or on a rotation cycle at specific locations within the “premier area” of the City Center.
  • Require food truck vendors to pay an annual fee of $300 for a general permit to operate with the city limits or $500 for a “premier” permit to operate within the City Center; for push carts operators, those fees would be $80 or $100, respectively.
  • Establish a Mobile Food Vendors Committee made up of representatives from various city departments, as well as REV Birmingham and the Greater Birmingham Street Food Coalition, to review all applications and approve their locations.
  • Restrict food trucks from operating with 150 feet of an existing restaurant.
  • Limit, with some exceptions, the hours during which mobile food vendors could operate within the City Center to between 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mondays through Fridays, plus some late-night hours determined on a case-by-case basis.

The Greater Birmingham Street Food Coalition, which represents the food truck and push cart vendors, has been vocal in its opposition to the ordinance as it it currently written, calling it “restrictive and oppressive.”

Find the entire article at al.com <here>

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Greater Birmingham Street Food CoalitionBIRMINGHAM, AL - The Birmingham City Council could vote Tuesday on a much-debated and long-delayed mobile food vendors’ ordinance that food truck owners say is “restrictive and oppressive” and, if passed, could put them out of business.

The Greater Birmingham Street Food Coalition, which represents the food truck and push cart operators, is opposed in particular to a provision in the proposed ordinance that would restrict them to certain designated zones and limit their ability to move around the city.

“The GBSFC is fighting this ordinance because, as it stands now, it is restrictive and oppressive,” Paget Pizitz, co-owner of the Melt food truck and vice president of the coalition, wrote in an email to AL.com. “If passed, it could put many of the trucks, carts and trailers out of business.

“This means countless loss of jobs and there is the potential that Birmingham would be a city without food trucks. This is particularly upsetting because the people of Birmingham have been so welcoming and supportive of the food truck community.”

The coalition has adopted the slogan “No Zones, Let Us Roam,” and is urging councilors to vote no on the ordinance as it is currently written.

“The Birmingham Food Truck Coalition is concerned with the proposed Birmingham Food Truck and Mobile Vendor Ordinance, as it currently stands,” the group said in a statement. “Among other provisions, the proposed ordinance would limit food truck operations to currently unknown ‘food zones’ to be designated in the future by the City Council.

The ordinance the council could vote on Tuesday would, among other things:

  • Require food truck vendors to pay an annual fee of $300 for a general permit to operate with the city limits or $500 for a “premier” permit to operate within the City Center; for push carts operators, those fees would be $80 or $100, respectively.
  • Establish a Mobile Food Vendors Committee made up of representatives from various city departments, as well as REV Birmingham and the Greater Birmingham Street Food Coalition, to review all applications and approve their locations.
  • Restrict food trucks from operating with 150 feet of an existing restaurant.
  • Limit, with some exceptions, the hours during which mobile food vendors could operate to between 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mondays through Fridays, plus some late-night hours determined on a case-by-case basis.

Find the entire article at AL.com <here>

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