Tags Posts tagged with "Cookbook"

Cookbook

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recipe journal

Many of the food truck owners I have spoken with are always looking for alternative revenue streams for their mobile food business. Some look at opening a brick and mortar location, some want to take popular menu items, sauces or seasonings to market. Others dream of turning their food truck recipes into a cookbook.

If the cookbook idea is something you’ve tossed around let’s look at some numbers that might help you proceed.

Something few people are aware of is that cookbooks are one of the top two best-selling book genres, second only to mystery novels. That’s right; more cookbooks are sold than any other type of book with the exception of mysteries. In North America alone, consumers purchase 60 million cookbooks each year.

With so many cookbooks on the market, you may wonder if there is a need for yet another. The simple answer is yes.

The cookbook buying public is huge. Do you really think there would already be so many cookbooks out there if there wasn’t an eager market for them? Do you think publishers would release as many cookbook titles as they do every year if there wasn’t a constant demand for more?

New cookbooks are being released all the time, and new cookbook authors appear every day.

While the best reason to write a cookbook is probably the same reason you started your food truck (because you want to share your great food and terrific stories with the public) it may not be the only reason. Whatever your motivation for writing a cookbook, the bottom line is writing a cookbook can help you create a new revenue stream for your food truck.

An added benefit is that writing a cookbook is more than just a new way of generating immediate income. That same cookbook has the potential to turn into a long-term profit producer. Cookbooks often continue to sell for many, many years after they were first published. A single cookbook can continue to provide long-term profits even years after you’ve written it.

So the cookbook you write now could very well still be making money for you even if you shut your food truck business down. This is referred to as “passive income” because after your initial investment of time, effort and money, you can sit back and spend your time doing other things while the money still continues to roll in.

But while a lot of people dream of writing a cookbook, for most it never goes beyond that – a dream. Why? Because they really have no clue how to do it. And so they may try, but don’t get far. Or they may never even try, because they lack the motivation and confidence, knowing they lack the necessary knowledge and guidance.

In future articles I’ll cover some of the aspects of writing a cookbook such as working with a publisher and self-publishing.

As a final note, just remember if you choose to start writing your own food truck cookbook, don’t get discouraged. Julia Child was rejected by almost every publishing house because “Mastering the Art of French Cooking” wasn’t considered a book that would sell.

Are you ready to take your dream of being a published cookbook author into a full-fledged and very profitable revenue stream for your food truck empire? Let us know your thoughts in the comment section below.

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Cookbooks and books about food trucks make great gifts for the culinarily inclined. And while it’s easy to pick a blockbuster off Amazon’s best-seller list, speaking to someone’s specific passion let’s them know that you “get” them. Here’s a brief list of tantalizing books about food trucks that we think would make wonderful gifts:

LA Son choi

Food Truck Stories and Cookbooks

“L.A. Son: My Life, My City, My Food” (Roy Choi, Hardcover $18.96) Abounding with both the food and the stories that gave rise to Choi’s inspired cooking, L.A. Son takes us through the neighborhoods and streets most tourists never see, from the hidden casinos where gamblers slurp fragrant bowls of pho to Downtown’s Jewelry District, where a ten-year-old Choi wolfed down Jewish deli classics between diamond deliveries; from the kitchen of his parents’ Korean restaurant and his mother’s pungent kimchi to the boulevards of East L.A. and the best taquerias in the country, to, at last, the curbside view from one of his emblematic Kogi taco trucks, where people from all walks of life line up for a revolutionary meal.

“The Truck Food Cookbook” (John T. Edge $15.05) John T. Edge shares the recipes, special tips, and techniques. And what a menu-board: Tamarind-Glazed Fried Chicken Drummettes. Kalbi Beef Sliders. Porchetta. The lily-gilding Grilled Cheese Cheeseburger. A whole chapter’s worth of tacos—Mexican, Korean, Chinese fusion. Plus sweets, from Sweet Potato Cupcakes to an easy-to-make Cheater Soft-Serve Ice Cream. Hundreds of full-color photographs capture the lively street food gestalt and its hip and funky aesthetic, making this both an insider’s cookbook and a document of the hottest trend in American food.

“Eat St.: Recipes from the Tastiest, Messiest, and Most Irresistible Food Trucks” (James Cunningham $16.82) Eat St. is a lip-smacking celebration of North America’s tastiest, messiest, and most irresistible street food. Join James Cunningham on the ultimate cross-country culinary road trip to find the most daring, delicious, and inventive street food across the country.

Thinking of Starting Your Own Truck?

“The Food Truck Handbook” (David Weber $14.50) Author David Weber, a food truck advocate and entrepreneur himself, is here to offer his practical, step-by-step advice to achieving your mobile food mogul dreams in The Food Truck Handbook.  This book cuts through all of the hype to give both hopeful entrepreneurs and already established truck owners an accurate portrayal of life on the streets. From concept to gaining a loyal following to preventative maintenance on your equipment this book covers it all.

“Running a Food Truck For Dummies” (Richard Myrick $16.73) A new generation of street food lovers are lining up at food trucks and food carts. Though the idea is a long-standing part of American and world culture, the street food industry has never enjoyed so much popularity or publicity. With lower start-up costs than traditional “store front” restaurants, food trucks offer a unique opportunity to entrepreneurs in a business climate where credit is tight and capital is scarce. In Running a Food Truck For Dummies, you’ll get all the delicious details needed to start your own food truck business quickly, affordably, and successfully.

(Please note that this book was written by Mobile Cuisine, Editor-in-Chief; Richard Myrick)

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