Tags Posts tagged with "Food Truck"

Food Truck

Food Portioning

Food portioning, while often overlooked, needs to be looked at as one of the most important activities in your food truck business. Not only does food portioning make an immediate impact on your customers’ experience but it also affects the food quality and food cost of your menu items.

When someone receives a smaller portion than the person who ordered the exact same thing right before them, customers usually notice and their mood sours.

Start At The Beginning

During the preparation process, inaccurate food portioning of ingredients in recipes can alter the food’s flavor and texture. Have you ever had a regular customer ask, “what have you done to the sauce?”

Food Portioning And Cost

Maybe the bigger issue that concerns food truck owners is how food portioning hits their bottom line. Just think about it like this, consistently over portioning a $6.00 per pound product just half an ounce adds almost 19 cents to the serving cost. Say you serve 100 a day, that’s $133 lost per week or almost $7,000 in a year.

That’s with just ONE product! Imagine the cost savings for your entire menu if food portioning became an integral part of your systems?

Use Technology For Food Portioning

Technological advances in scales and slicing equipment keeps making it easier for employees to portion products faster and with much greater accuracy. The newest digital scales are portable, easy to read, have automatic counting functions and can be equipped with push button or hands free capabilities.

Anything you can do to help your staff do a better job of portioning is usually money well spent. Does your staff have the appropriate sized cups, scoops, ladles and other measuring devises at their disposal and are they consistently using the correct ones?

Also, never expect what you don’t inspect. One food truck owner I know has a habit of pulling one item off the line each shift and weighing the key ingredients. If something’s not right, he addresses the issue immediately with his staff. He says that this one practice, more than any other, helps him control portion sizes and keep his food cost in line.

How’s your food portioning? Any improvement in this area should result in happier guests, lower food cost and a healthier bottom line.

Do you have any food portioning tips to share with our readers? We’d love to hear them. You can send via email, Twitter or Facebook.

linkedin profile

Your LinkedIn profile page is your personal home page to the business world. To enhance your profile, log into your LinkedIn account, click Profile, choose Edit from the top-left navigation menu that appears and then follow these tips.

10 Tips To Enhance You LinkedIn Profile
  • Create a customized URL.
  • Add as many past employers as you have had so the most amount of former co-workers can find you.
  • Make sure your professional headline emphasizes any keywords you want to use to promote yourself.
  • Make your profile public and set it to Full View so your LinkedIn profile will show up in Web search results.
  • Add links from your LinkedIn profile to Web sites you are trying to promote, like your blog, or company Web site.
  • For Web site links that you add to your profile, select Other and rename each link to include meaningful keywords, so instead of it saying “My Blog” it would say “My Food Truck Blog.”
  • Include all of your main e-mail addresses in your profile so people can connect with you. LinkedIn does not display your e-mail addresses to the public; they simply keep your e-mail addresses on file when someone tries to connect with you.
  • Fill out the Summary field of your profile with all of your critical skills and important career-related keywords, and be sure to fill out the Skills section with your skill list as well.
  • Add a professional photo to your profile.
  • Add a link to your LinkedIn profile in your e-mail signature file.

If you are active on LinkedIn, please feel free to join our group page “Food Truck Revolution” to discuss the world of food trucks you live in. We’ve have a roster of over 1,500 people to discuss our industry on any topic you have interest.

If you have any additional LinkedIn profile tips or suggestions, you can share them with us on Twitter or Facebook.

food truck kitchen fires

tip of the day

Today we will look at how to put out fires that occur in your food truck or your commercial kitchen.

When a fire starts in these areas you need to act fast to keep the fire from getting out of control. But how you act depends on what kind of fire you have and where it is.

Follow these instructions for putting out food truck kitchen fires:
  • If you have a fire in the oven or the microwave, close the door or keep it closed, and turn off the oven. Don’t open the door! The lack of oxygen will suffocate the flames.
  • If your oven continues to smoke like a fire is still going on in there, call the fire department.
  • If you have a fire in a cooking pan, use an oven mitt to clap on the lid, then move the pan off the burner, and turn off the stove. The lack of oxygen will stop the flames in a pot.
  • If you can’t safely put the lid on a flaming pan or you don’t have a lid for the pan, use your fire extinguisher. Aim at the base of the fire — not the flames.
  • Never use water to put out grease fires! Water repels grease and can spread the fire by splattering the grease. Instead, try one of these methods:
    • If the fire is small, cover the pan with a lid and turn off the burner.
    • Throw lots of baking soda or salt on it. Never use flour, which can explode or make the fire worse.
    • Smother the food truck kitchen fire with a wet towel or other large wet cloth.
    • Use a fire extinguisher.
  • Don’t swat at a fire with a towel, apron, or other clothing. You’re likely to fan the flames and spread the fire.
  • If the food truck kitchen fire is spreading and you can’t control it, get everyone off the truck or out of the building and call 911. Make sure your entire staff knows how to get out of these areas safely in case of a fire. Practice your fire escape routes at least twice a year.

Do you have any additional tips for putting out food truck kitchen fires? Leave your tip by Tweeting us or share them on our Facebook page.

Taking Over An Existing Food Truck

Small businesses across the country have been taking a beating over the last few years due to the economy and even the growing mobile food industry isn’t an exception.

No matter the reasons behind some food trucks closing, there are still a huge number of individuals who are looking to enter the industry.

RELATED: Find Food Trucks For Sale At Mobile Cuisine

Taking over a failed truck can be an easy way to get onto the streets of your local area. Here are four tips to follow if you are taking over an existing truck without plans on re-branding it.

Four Tips For Taking Over An Existing Food Truck Business

tip of the day

Communicate the change in ownership to old customers

When you are taking over an existing food truck business that has been around for some time, show the longtime customers that you appreciate their business by giving them customer appreciation discounts.

Get to know them and establish yourself as the new owner. When people are used to brands they are not used to change. Let them know that their favorite staples will remain on the menu.

Assure them that you are going to carry on the brand just as good as it was before, if not better.

Add some new items

When comes to change you have to be very careful with established food truck brands. Keep on the old staples, but make sure that the quality of the food is upgraded to current standards.

Familiarize yourself with new taste profiles, quality control and other things that will make a difference to new and old recipes. Let older customers know about the new changes so they won’t be shocked.

Bump up the truck’s profile

Don’t be afraid to step up your game and compete with other food truck businesses in the area. Do things that have never been done at that truck before. Increase advertising and marketing.

Play on new strategies in social networking. Use Twitter, Facebook, and geo-location services like Foursquare to find new customers.

Think with the new generation in mind. It can be a hard pill to swallow to change something that has been around awhile.

Consider hiring new staff

The final tip for taking over an existing food truck business is to analyze the current staff and determine if they have what it takes to move forward with your changes. You’ll probably have to get rid some staff that don’t fit your plans.

Put them to work to see what they can do. Keep the ones that are willing to listen to change and who are loyal to your vision for the direction of your business and not the previous owner’s vision.

RELATED: Post Your Food Truck Jobs At Mobile Cuisine

Have you been involved taking over an existing food truck business? If so, we’d love to hear how you handled it. You can share your thoughts with us on Facebook or Twitter.

interview questions

I have recently noticed a lot of food trucks across the country have been looking for window service staff and even some discussion in message boards where vendors are seeking insight on how to hire top performers.

Coming from my time as a recruiter (aka headhunter) in the automotive industry, I can tell you that the best answer to this question is in asking the right questions to determine the skills that the server is bringing to the table.

These interview questions will help you determine whether the applicant you are interviewing has the talent and personality to be a top performer in your food truck. What you can learn from the answers to these questions will help you avoid poor hiring decisions and enable you to build your staff with the best servers in town.

Here are four interview questions that should be included in every window server interview:

Describe Your Favorite Meal.

This will give you insight into an applicant’s ability to sell and their passion for food. If they cannot describe their favorite meal in a way that makes you salivate, how are they going to describe your food truck specials? Any applicant that fails to impress you with their description will require a great deal of time and effort to train. This should not result in an immediate rejection, but should serve as a red flag.

What Do You Like About The Mobile Food Industry?

The answer you are looking for here is one that shows a passion for the industry. Be cautious of a server that loves the ability to work with friends, get off for their band’s gigs, or make a bunch of money. These servers are looking at the industry as a means to an end, but not passionate about it. Loving the pace of the business, impacting the guests’ experience, or contributing to a team are all great answers that come from top performers.

What Would You Change About The Food Truck Industry?

This question works in much the same way as the previous one, but measures something different. The answer to this question will uncover the level of frustration and burnout a server may already have with the industry. This gives them a chance to vent their frustrations to you, before they vent them on the guest. Be wary of any answers that are critical of guests or former managers. A hostile response may indicate a server who will lower morale.

Why Do You Want To Work Here?

This question is commonly asked, but the answer is often misinterpreted. The answer to this question will give you a great idea of how they view your food truck. If they cannot tell you why your food truck excites them, then they are probably just looking for a job. While all applicants are looking for a job, those that do not hold your mobile food business in high regard will often jump ship at the next opportunity. Finding employees who are excited about your food truck will significantly decrease turnover and help insure that your new employees bring a sense of excitement to your staff.

None of us should be naive enough to believe that an applicant will be completely honest in their interview. There are always going to be exaggeration and positive spin placed on their responses. One of the best ways to avoid this is to ask questions that they are not expecting or that actually test their skills.

Responses that have not been rehearsed will provide more accurate information than those that are carefully planned. If you want a more accurate answer, you need to ask a better question. These are five great questions to start with.

If you’ve found interview questions for your window servers we’ve missed, you can share them with us on Facebook or Twitter.

food truck employees

Most food truck kitchens require more than a single set of hands to keep up with customer orders. Because of this it’s almost a necessity for most starting a food truck business to hire food truck employees before you hit the streets.

These steps will help you start the hiring process and ensure you are compliant with key federal and state regulations.

Food Truck Employees: How To Employ Your First
Obtain an Employer Identification Number (EIN)

Before hiring your first first employees, you need to get an employment identification number (EIN) from the U.S. Internal Revenue Service. The EIN is often referred to as an Employer Tax ID or as Form SS-4. The EIN is necessary for reporting taxes and other documents to the IRS. In addition, the EIN is necessary when reporting information about your employees to state agencies. You can apply for an EIN online or contact the IRS directly.

Set up Records for Withholding Taxes

According to the IRS, you must keep records of employment taxes for at least four years. Keeping good records can also help you monitor the progress of your food truck business, prepare financial statements, identify sources of receipts, keep track of deductible expenses, prepare your tax returns, and support items reported on tax returns.

Below are three types of withholding taxes you need for your business:

Federal Income Tax Withholding
Every employee must provide an employer with a signed withholding exemption certificate (Form W-4) on or before the date of employment. The employer must then submit Form W-4 to the IRS.

Federal Wage and Tax Statement
Every year, food truck employers must report to the federal government wages paid and taxes withheld for each employee. This report is filed using Form W-2, wage and tax statement. You will need to complete a W-2 form for each employee who you pay a salary, wage or other compensation.

Employers must send Copy A of W-2 forms to the Social Security Administration by the last day of February to report wages and taxes of your employees for the previous calendar year. In addition, you should send copies of W-2 forms to your employees by Jan. 31 of the year following the reporting period.

State Taxes
Depending on the state where your employees are located, you may be required to withhold state income taxes.

Employee Eligibility Verification

Federal law requires employers to verify an employee’s eligibility to work in the United States. Within three days of hire, employers must complete Form I-9, employment eligibility verification, which requires employers to examine documents to confirm the employee’s citizenship or eligibility to work in the U.S. Employers can only request documentation specified on the I-9 form.

Employers do not need to submit the I-9 form with the federal government but are required to keep them on file for three years after the date of hire or one year after the date of the employee’s termination, whichever is later.

Employers can use information taken from the Form I-9 to electronically verify the employment eligibility of newly hired employees by registering with E-Verify.

Register with Your State’s New Hire Reporting Program

All employers are required to report newly hired and re-hired employees to a state directory within 20 days of their hire or rehire date. Visit the New Hires Reporting Requirements page to learn more and find links to your state’s New Hire Reporting System.

Obtain Workers’ Compensation Insurance

All businesses with employees are required to carry workers’ compensation insurance coverage through a commercial carrier, on a self-insured basis or through their state’s Workers’ Compensation Insurance program.

Post Required Notices

Employers are required to display certain posters in the workplace that inform employees of their rights and employer responsibilities under labor laws.

File Your Taxes

Generally, employers who pay wages subject to income tax withholding, Social Security and Medicare taxes must file IRS Form 941, Employer’s Quarterly Federal Tax Return.

If you do not have an accounting background or do not feel confident in filing your food truck business taxes, be sure to reach out to an accountant for some assistance when hiring your first food truck employees.

If you have any steps we may have missed for hiring food truck employees, please feel free to add them in the comment section below, Tweet us or share them on our Facebook page.

food truck tax return

It’s tax day again and as many of you know, completing and filing a small business tax return for your food truck business is different than completing and filing your personal tax return.

The primary difference is the number of forms that must be completed and the difference of your business’ write offs and deductions.

While business tax returns are not overly complicated, ensure that you use the proper form and research any questions you have. The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) website is relatively easy to navigate and provides answers to most questions. If you don’t feel comfortable filing your business taxes yourself, reach out to your accountant for help.

Here are three tips to filing your food truck tax return:

Keep Your Recipes

Hopefully, you’ve collected all of the receipts related to your businesses expenses. Any expense for which you can provide a receipt if requested you can comfortably deduct, but if you lack a receipt, think twice about whether the deduction is worthwhile.

Small costs unsupported by a receipt can turn into a huge headache if the IRS decides to audit you and your return. Take a walk around your office to identify possible deductions. Miles driven on personal vehicles when doing business related driving, the mileage your drive your truck throughout the year, computer equipment and other expenses are deductible.

Don’t Forget Your Start-up Costs

The IRS allows all new businesses to deduct up to $5,000 in start-up costs. These costs can include attorney or accountant fees, training materials, employee training and other business expenses. Any personal training or education you completed for business purposes is also deductible (think culinary school).

Complete All the Forms

Unlike a personal tax return, a food truck tax return consists of several different forms. One form lists profit and losses, while another calculates the self-employment taxes. Determine which forms you must complete through the IRS website. Completing each one and submitting them together makes it less likely that you’ll be audited.

While you may have already (let’s hope you did) submitted your food truck tax return for 2015, do you have any additional tax tips for prospective food truck owners? We’d love to hear your thoughts.

You can share your ideas in the comment section below, Tweet us or share them on our Facebook page.

menu pricing

Setting prices for the products you sell from your food truck is one of the most crucial components to running it, because the prices you set directly affect your ability to sell, cover costs, and generate your desired level of profit.

Good Dog Houston Menu
Image from Good Dog Houston

Food cooked on food trucks is normally priced on a per item basis. Typically, prices of menu items vary according to food costs (the actual amount it costs you to make dishes) and sometimes according to demand. For example, if your truck is famous for serving a unique dish, you may be able to use a higher markup to your costs of preparing it.

Most food service establishments target food-cost percentages between 20 and 40 percent. In other words, if a menu item’s total food costs are $2, its sale price should be between $5 (40 percent) and $10 (20 percent). You can adjust the actual percentage you use as you deem necessary. For items that require more time and labor to prepare, you may have to increase the percentage to keep your pricing competitive.

New restaurant and food truck owners alike typically use one of the following methods to determine menu pricing:

  • Food-cost percentage pricing
  • Factor pricing

These methods are merely guidelines for your use and aren’t absolute rules. If your market will bear menu item pricing that exceeds what you come up with by using these methods, do it!

Food-cost percentage menu pricing for your food truck business

The food-cost percentage pricing method is the most widely used method for menu pricing. To determine prices with this method, you need to know the target food-cost percentage and the actual food cost for the item, which you plug into this formula:

Food cost ÷ target food-cost percentage = menu price

For example, suppose you have a cheeseburger on your menu with a food cost of $1.50 (meaning that the ingredients used to make one cheeseburger costs you $1.50), and your target food-cost percentage is 35 percent. The calculation to price this item is as follows:

$1.50 ÷ 0.35 = $4.30

To get an idea of how various cost percentage affects your prices, take a look at these numbers:

Percentage Food Cost Menu Price (min)
20 $1.50 $7.50
25 $1.50 $6.00
30 $1.50 $5.00
35 $1.50 $4.30
40 $1.50 $3.75

Food cost is only one part of the equation here. This formula doesn’t take labor or other operational costs into consideration. So the lower you can get your food costs, the better off you’ll be, and the more you’ll have left over for labor and overhead.

Factor menu pricing for food truck items

The factor pricing method uses a factor, such as 30 percent, that represents food-cost percentage. To determine prices with this method, you multiply the food cost by your pricing factor. To calculate the pricing factor and the menu price, you need the target food-cost percentage and the actual food cost for the item, which you plug into this formula:

100 ÷ target food-cost percentage = pricing factor

Food cost x pricing factor = menu price

For example, suppose your target food-cost percentage is 30 percent. Divide 30 into 100, and you get 3.33 as your pricing factor. If the food cost is $1.50 and the factor is 3.33, you end up with the following:

$1.50 x 3.33 = $5.00

WARNING: This method doesn’t take into consideration that some foods have a higher cost than others. Factoring has the potential to overprice high-cost food items and under price low-cost items.

Do you have tips you’ve learned from menu pricing in your food truck business? We’d love to hear your thoughts. You can share them in the comment section below, Tweet us or share them on our Facebook page.

social media sites

With new social media sites popping up all over the internet, it can be overwhelming to food truck owners to figure out which to focus their time and energy on.

Based off a recent survey we conducted from our readers, the top four social media sites that food truck customers use are: Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and Instagram.

4 Social Media Sites For Your Food Truck
Facebook

After Myspace, Facebook took control of social media and has not let go. 67% of internet users visit Facebook regularly so you’ll want to start here.

Beneficial Features:

About section. Publish a full biography including contact information about your food truck.

Large images. Facebook’s platform is great for posting pictures. Take a snapshot of your daily special or fun events your truck has taken part in.

Advertise. Facebook Ads allow you to target your specific demographic while also setting a specific budget.

Twitter

Next in line is Twitter. Quick and to the point. Reach out and communicate with others in real time. While Facebook may be used for many of the same purposes, Twitter is much quicker.

Beneficial Features:

Break the news. Let your followers know where you are heading when it happens. Twitter is instantaneous and will reach your followers faster than any other social networks.

Get feedback. Twitter is also a great place to get feedback and learn about your customers.

Utilize hashtags. Hashtags (commonly known as the pound sign) on Twitter are a great system to take advantage of. Using hashtags will increase the reach of your tweet and also increase the chances of your tweet being seen.

Pinterest

Like it? Then pin it! Pinterest is a great way to tell your story using pictures. Pinterest allows you to collect, organize and pin pictures to boards.

Beneficial Features:

Organize. Pinterest allows you to organize your photos into similar groups called “boards.” This allows you to “build” a message, theme or group similar photos together.

Get customer’s mouths watering. Food trucks using Pinterest can organize a page by posting enticing photos with brief descriptions about menu items. This can also include recipes to popular items.

Go beyond food. Your food truck should be about more than just food. Feature boards that tell your brand story, values and mission.

Instagram

Pictures speak a thousand words – and Instagram is the poor man’s photography studio. Instagram gives users the ability to apply different filters to photos. There are no groups or “boards” like with Pinterest, however, Instagram is easily integrated into Facebook and Twitter, giving pictures extra exposure on the different social networks.

Beneficial Features:

Customers. Featuring customers enjoying their meals, or sharing images that customers have taken of your truck are a great way to draw attention to your mobile food business.

Show your atmosphere. Show pictures of the atmosphere around your truck. You can show actual customers enjoying a dining experience or even the fun they are having while waiting to order. The filters provided by Instagram will allow you to spruce it up a bit.

Aesthetics. You don’t necessarily have to show pictures related to your food. What’s the atmosphere like around your truck? What about the scenery of the areas you park in?

Remember social media is a great way advertise. Follow some of these tips and utilize them to increase followers and customers. But don’t be afraid to be creative and innovative. Also, remember most social media sites can be synced together and it’s alright if some of your pages overlap.

Which social media sites are you using that aren’t listed here? We’d love to hear your thoughts. You can share them in the comment section below, Tweet us or share them on our Facebook page.

word of mouth

Word of mouth marketing will always be the best form of promotion any mobile food industry operator can expect to achieve. For this reason, the staff at Mobile Cuisine Magazine has decided that we needed to look at the two most commonly used forms of word of mouth marketing; on and offline word of mouth.

Today, in part 1 of this series will look at the oldest and most reliable form of word of mouth marketing that almost everyone is accustomed to, we will be referring to this as “offline” word of mouth.

To start things off let’s ask you some questions to get you started thinking about creating word of mouth recommendations for your mobile business.

Why should anyone talk about your food truck or cart in a positive way?

Do customers talk about your mobile eatery if your food was good?

Do they talk about your business if your service was good?

In most cases the vast majority of people do not spread good things about a food establishment if the customer receives the type of food and service they expect.

Do customers talk about tell others if your food or your service was bad?

When customers receive poor quality food or bad service, this is when many people make sure to let others know about the issues that they have had with a particular food truck or other variation of street food vendor.

Now that we have established that a business owner is unlikely to get positive word of mouth with good service and food, yet very likely to get negative word of mouth for poor service or food, we can conclude that positive word of mouth is much harder to achieve and negative word of mouth is almost an absolute given.

The big question many will have is, why the difference? It is rather simple if you spend any time thinking about it. It is in our human nature to hold onto anger longer than pleasure. We tend to discuss the reasons we are upset far more than why we might be happy about something. Being frustrated or upset by a situation will burn deeply into our memory and we will tend to overreact.

In these cases, the food truck business the primary loser. Yes, the customer may have felt slighted, but ultimately, the business will take the brunt of their frustration in the long run. It often doesn’t take more than a small incident to create bad feelings, particularly when your customer has had a bad day already. You and your customer service staff must be aware of what our customers are seeking. Be understanding and alert as awareness and intuitiveness are key ingredients in customer service. Great customer service comes from paying attention and sensing the moods of everyone that steps up to your truck.

Turning around a situation is well within the bounds of well trained and understanding staff, so all is not lost.

How to create powerful word of mouth is a whole study in itself, but the basics are common sense and logical.

Very often just providing good service or food is not enough to encourage word of mouth recommendations; after all, these things are expected. There needs to be additional reasons for wanting to bring up the subject of where you ate last night and how good it was. Obvious examples are special occasions, such as Valentine’s Day. This could trigger conversations like, “What did you do last night?”…”Oh, we went to <insert your food truck name here>, wonderful food, really fast and friendly, you should definitely try it sometime.”

Although a nice comment, even this type of statement may not attract someone to follow their friend or acquaintance’s recommendation. For word of mouth to be effective it has to have some passion and excitement in it. That means your customer has to have been excited by what they experienced. This, in turn, means that your customer will want to instigate a conversation, rather than just respond to a question they may never be asked.

Hopefully this will make sense to you. Try to remember the last time you were wowed enough by a product or service to start a conversation about it. Very often these situations are few and far between.

How are you going to create sufficient excitement so that your customers want to tell the world? If your customer service is full of passion, that carries over to your customers and can be infectious. Without the passion in your service, how do you expect your customers to get excited? So that’s your starting point, customer service that is full of passion and fire.

Next, ignite the fires of passion in your customer, get them involved and encourage them to join the party. It is much easier to get parties of four or more people to get into the mood. Couples are different, they may well be in their own world. Individuals need more personal attention. Therefore it makes more sense and it is much easier to encourage parties of four or more to become your advocates.

With a little encouragement you should be able to create some word of mouth activity from at least 1 or 2 of the party. Ask if you can take some photos of them in the party spirit. Tell them you would like to place the photos on your customer wall board as well as your blog. (You will need their permission to do this) Offer to email copies of the photos to each of them, so that they can share them with their friends.

For individuals and couples, give them a couple of your business cards each and ask them to pass the cards to a friend or colleague who would appreciate your kind of hospitality, food and service.  Incidentally, we recommend a specially printed card for this purpose. It is very rare for a restaurateur to do this and they really are missing an out on an opportunity.

Manage and meet customer expectations all the time. How do you do this? Back up your brand’s claim or promise each time. A good example is:

  • Maintain your price range within the level your buyers expect, if you need to increase prices make sure you communicate this to them with a little justification of why you need to do so.

Customer service is the framework where loyalty and trust is built on. This is where your company can really stand out in a different way from your competition. Quality customer service is simply going out of your way to please the customer. It is that extra effort, one sincere action, the personal touch that ultimately affects buyers choice to keep remembering you and recommending you.

In part 2 we will be discussing how to utilize the power of word of mouth online; we call this word of mouse.

Keep an eye out for part 2 to be published within the next week. In the meantime if you would like to share how you encourage word of mouth, go ahead and let us know via the comments button below.

Part 2

Social Connections