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Food Trucks

food truck business cards

There are plenty of ways to layout your business cards for your food truck business; the key is to make sure it matches your truck’s branding plan. To help you with making sure your food truck business cards are developed properly here are a few tips to use when designing or reviewing them.

5 Simple Rules For Your Food Truck Business Cards
Include important information

Make sure you include all the information on your food truck business cards that you think a client would find useful. We’ve provided a quick checklist, but you may have other things you want to throw in as well.

  • Your name – Put the name your contacts know you by.
  • What you do – Remember to include what you do or what defines your job scope within your food truck business.
  • Contact information – Phone number, website url, e-mail, office address, social media profiles etc.
  • Catering – It’s very important to let prospective customers know that you provide catering services from your food truck. You can create specific marketing collateral for your catering services, but you need to make sure your food truck business cards let them know it is a service you offer.
Ensure your text is readable

This is an often overlooked element in food truck business cards I’ve seen over the years. You don’t want prospective clients to have to strain their eyes to read your website address or email. Make sure your text is at least 8 pt, in a clear readable font and in bold color. Anything smaller than 8 pt may look fine on your monitor, but may be printed as a fuzzy, smudged-out line. You could also try to accentuate your name or important contact information by making it slightly bigger or bolder than the rest of your information.

Your logo

If you’ve got a well-designed logo, let it subtly dominate your business card. It is a visual representation of your brand and will catch the eye of members of your target market.

The back side

There is a lot of debate about what should go on the back side of your business card. Some say keep it blank so people you hand it to can write notes. While others say put more information here. We suggest doing both. Use some of the space to provide returning customers a free offer, but also allow some space for note-taking.

Avoid using borders

It’s best to try to avoid using borders on your food truck business cards. They may look good, but when the cards are cut, you will most likely have some ‘lop-sided’ edges. All printers have a margin of error for cutting your cards, which can be as much as a few millimeters, so expect some variance in the area where the blade falls.

Do you have any additional tips for food truck business cards? What’s worked for you, what hasn’t. We’d love to hear your thoughts. You can share them with us via email, Twitter or Facebook.

food safety for large events

Food truck businesses can pose a bigger risk to food safety than brick and mortar restaurants, not because they are dirtier than restaurants or that they aren’t held to the same safety standards, but because the more the food is handled or transported, the greater the risk of bacterial contamination.

To prevent a food borne illness issues with customers food truck owners have to keep a watchful eye on employees to make sure safe food handling practices are observed at all times.

Today we provide 5 tips every mobile food vendor can follow in order to keep their customers safe and maintain food safety for large events.

5 Tips Food Truck Food Safety For Large Events
Safe Food Practices

For large food truck events, most food is either prepped ahead of time at a central and then transported to the event or made at an onsite kitchen, if there is one available. Either way, all food must be cooked to the recommended temperatures in order to maintain safe food temperatures.

Insulated Food Carriers

Depending on the size and duration of a food truck event, there is a good chance you may have to reload your food truck with product to prepare and sell. Both hot and cold foods need to be kept at the appropriate temperatures when being transported to the event. The only way for mobile food vendors to assure hot foods are kept hot and cold foods cold while in transit is by using insulated food carriers.

Reheat Foods

The FDA Food Code stipulates that any food that needs to be reheated must reach an internal temperature of 165 °F for 15 seconds to be considered safe, so be sure that any food items that were cooked off-site then chilled for transport are reheated appropriately to maintain food safety.

Time and Temperature

The two-hour rule still applies for potentially hazardous foods. All hot food needs to be kept above 140 °F and cold food needs to be kept below 40 °F for proper food safety. If the food is outside of this range for more than two hours, that food needs to be thrown away.

Ice, Ice, Baby

At all times, ice that is used to chill food or beverage bottles needs to be kept separate from ice that goes into drinks. Display ice can pick up bacteria and other contaminants from the items it comes into contact with, which can in turn contaminate beverage ice and a customer’s drink.

BONUS: Provide extra protection for food truck events

For these outdoor events, wind, flies and other vermin are potential hazards. The best way to protect against these dangers is by covering all displayed food, throwing all waste in a waste container with a lid, using wind guards on windy days and setting the food tables up underneath a tent.

Do you have any additional tips for food safety for large events? We’d love to hear from you. You can send us your tips via email, Twitter or Facebook.

farmers market

With the rapid growth of the mobile food industry, we are constantly asked for alternative locations food trucks can be located to garner additional business for the owners. Farmers markets can be awesome weekend work for food truck owners for many reasons.

 

They give local small businesses a venue to sell their fantastic food products at, which allow them to interact directly with an entirely different consumer base than they are accustomed to finding on the streets of their city during the week. This opportunity allows truck owners to become an even larger part of their local communities, not to mention, they can be fun to participate in.

For anyone who is looking to get into selling their food truck products at farmers markets and wants to know how, we’ve put together this article to show you everything you need to know.

Planning For The Farmers Market
Menu Items

When determining what your farmers market menu should look like, visit your local markets to see what other vendors are selling. You may be the only food truck at a market; however there may already be other vendors who sell items similar to what your truck sells. Be sure your menu is unique. Pay attention to what items you feel are missing from the markets.

Markets want to offer a variety of unique and wonderful products. Specialized and/or organic items will always do well at farmers markets, because customers can’t find them anywhere else or they know farmers market products are local and usually better quality. Whatever you choose, be sure it’s high quality and that you know your menu ingredients like the back of your hand. People not only go to markets for great local products, they expect to be educated as well.

Finding A Farmers Market

farmers marketDue to the growth of interest in farmers markets, nationwide, many markets have less space to accept new vendors. The vendors they do have usually have been participating in the market for seasons, if not years, and have gained long-lasting relationships with the market and their weekly customers.

Research all of the markets in your area and surrounding areas. Every market is different. Some will be more appropriate for your food truck than others. Think about the distance to each market, size of the market, rules and regulations the market has and the type of customer it attracts.

Once you have a market you are interested in joining, contact the market manager to inquire about applications and entry forms. It is best to apply at the beginning of the market year (during the winter season, depending on where you are located).

Expect the application process to take up to a few weeks, or even a few months.  This timing will depend on the amount applications they have to review, whether or not they have a board to review and vote on applicants and/or the size of the market. Some require an interview, application fee and/or one time, weekly, monthly or yearly fee to participate in the market.

Farmers markets are becoming more and more competitive. As said before, markets want to offer a variety of products, so be sure your product is one they need and/or will diversify the market. Consider applying to more than one. Never take a rejection seriously. In fact, if you don’t get accepted into a market, you should always apply the following year.

Farmers Market Tips

  • Never forget your necessary licenses, permits and proof of insurance. Inspectors show up at the most inconvenient times to check to see if you have these.
  • Have shopping bags available for your customers. You can choose whether you want to use simple plastic shopping bags or pretty paper bags. Another fantastic way to market your business is to have “green” reusable shopping bags created with your logo and food truck information on them. Selling these items at or near your cost for them will get your brand advertised as they are carried around the market, or other locations the customer chooses to use it.
  • If you are sampling, you must provide disposable single use utensils for distribution of samples to customers. If you have a product like peanuts, where people have to break the shell open, to get to the inside, we recommend having a small container for the shells (waste). Be sure to clearly mark your containers. You don’t want people to mistake the sample container for the waste container. It happens all the time.
  • It is also very important to keep an eye out for children. A lot of times children walk around the markets on their own or with friends and will ask for samples. We recommend never letting a child have a sample without the permission of a parent. You don’t know what type of food allergies they may have and it is respectful to the parent to ask first.
  • Always arrive on time, if not early, to farmers markets. Managers are not fond of having to deal with late vendors. Sometimes, markets are small and if you arrive late, you will not be able to enter the market area to park. Customers don’t appreciate coming to the market to get your products, finding that you are not there or are busy setting up, when everyone else is prepared and ready. Give yourself enough time to get to the market, set up and even get there early, so you are situated and ready for those early and anxious customers.
  • Be sure to approach every farmers market with energy and enthusiasm. Be prepared to offer tips, recipes and other educational information to your customers. Get creative and come up with conversation starters (i.e. tell them a great story that has to do with your product). At the same time manage your time with customers. Some of them take their time through markets and are interested in the experience, others want to get in, get what they came for and get out. Don’t let a line build up.
  • Memorize your regular customer’s names. They will most likely remember yours if they come to you each week. Educate yourself about the other vendor’s, where they are located and what they sell, in case someone asks.

We hope this article gives you an idea of how to begin the process of your food truck becoming a successful farmers market participant.

If you are a farmers market food truck veteran, we’d love to hear about your experiences. You can share them with us via email, Twitter or Facebook.

food truck laws

Opening a food truck requires a lot of work and preparation. As a part of the preparation, you must become familiar with and adhere to the local food truck laws that govern the mobile food industry.

Failure to do so could result in your mobile business failing inspection and potentially being shut down. Since this is never a food truck vendor’s desired goal, you will want to make sure you understand the food truck laws and ensure that your food truck follows them.

Food Truck Laws You Need To Know

If you are opting to build your truck business from scratch rather than purchase an existing truck, you will first have to familiarize yourself with parking and zoning laws. In each city and town there are specific zones set up that separate where a particular business can operate.

Before you purchase your truck, it is important that you contact the city parking and zoning departments to ensure that the area you are interested in operating in will allow your vehicle to set up shop. You will be best served to make sure you know any vehicle size limitations as well as the amount of time a food truck can remain parked in one location before being required to move.

The most important laws that you will need to understand for your food truck are those that center on the Food Code. The Food Code was established by the FDA as a guideline for local and state governments as a way to regulate the mobile food industry and protect the health and safety of consumers, residents and employees.

Though it is used as a guideline, the Food Code is not a requirement of the state and local government. Each will have their own version specific to that area. In most areas, the Department of Health will be in charge of establishing and enforcing the local Food and Health Codes. It is important that you contact the Department of Health in the beginning of your planning stages of your business to ensure that everything is done according to the local laws.

Given its name and the fact that it was established by the FDA, the Food Code can often be mistaken for regulations that only govern food. This is not accurate as the Department of Health in your local area will have laws and regulations set up that cover virtually anything related to health, food and safety in a food service business.

Some things that these laws will cover include:

  • Preparation, handling, storage and display of any food products that your mobile business plans to offer.
  • The health, cleanliness and hygiene of the personnel that work in your business.
  • All aspects of the equipment and utensils that are being used including what material they are manufactered of, the installation, and even how they are stored.
  • Every facet of the utilities and services that you will need including the generators, propane and waste water, how you dispose of waste, and the way you handle pests.
  • How the truck is constructed and whether it holds the proper features such as ventilation and lighting.
  • Whether or not inspections are carried out, passed and any enforcement is needed.

The best way to ensure the success of your food truck business from the start is to contact the proper agencies and know your local laws before you begin planning. This allows you to ensure that everything from your equipment to your food meets the criteria in the codes so that you can pass inspection and have a successful opening day.

See if we have your city food truck laws listed on our quick link page.

If you know of a link we are missing, please feel free to share it with us via email, Twitter or Facebook.

failure-success
Which way is your food truck headed?

With the continued growth of the mobile food industry, there are still some trucks that have not been able to succeed. For some, the reasons lay in the over regulation they face in their local areas, but for most, the reasons can be found simply by looking in the mirror.

We have previously written the primary reasons that food trucks have failed, in this article we wanted to extend the number of reasons and show how to avoid them. Owning a food truck requires the owners to wear many hats, and without the knowledge of some of the common shortfalls they can face, they can easily fall into these problem areas without even realizing it.

No marketing plan. 

A marketing plan outlines the steps you intend to take to sell your food truck menu items.  As one component of the overall business plan, it identifies your niche, your product and the strategies you’ll employ to reach your target market, as well as how much you intend to spend on this marketing (with the use of Twitter and Facebook, this can just involve the investment of time).   Marketing is fundamental to your company’s success.  Without it, you won’t have any customers or clients.  For this reason, it’s critical to spend the extra effort to develop one, even if it only is to include social media platforms.

No customer service program.

You and your food truck are in business only because you have people lining up at your service window.  In order to get a customer following and to maintain it, it’s important to have a customer service program.  A program can include anything from the methods you use to gain new customers, to how you service them once they have become customers.  It includes follow up visits to new parking locations, providing information to them about current or new products and services (such as catering), and, most importantly, kind, courteous, and prompt service when they have a problem or issue.  It is time consuming to get new customers.  It’s better and easier to retain the one’s you have by employing an outstanding customer service program.

No strategic partners. 

Successful food truck business owners typically don’t go it alone.  They associate, partner, and network with other successful food trucks.  Partnering with others is a way to quickly expand the reach of your own mobile business.  There’s a wonderful synergy that comes with doing things with other truck in your area.  There are more ideas, more knowledge, and more resources to create products and services.

No ways of monitoring progress. 

You cannot manage what you cannot monitor or measure.  Every food truck business needs to identify its key success factors.  It might be the number of products sold, the number of service hours provided, or even the perception of your mobile business in the local community.  The only way you can improve your business and attain the success you desire, is by measuring the results of your actions.  You’ll be able to identify what is working and also where the shortfalls exist.  You can use any number of methods including internal operating checklists, customer surveys, and even peer reviews.  This valuable feedback will be extremely useful in realigning your business efforts in the direction that maximizes the success of your mobile food empire.

No commitment to learning. 

There is no place for complacency when it comes to being a mobile food entrepreneur.  Successful food truck owners search constantly for new and better ways to get customers as well as to serve the ones they already have.  They are aware of the latest food service industry trends and ideas so they can create products and services which best serve the changing needs of their target market.  They learn about and implement processes that increase the effectiveness of their day-to-day operations.  By committing yourself to learning and to implementing what you learn, you’re committing yourself to success in all parts of your business.

facebook marketing tips

Recent studies have found that mobile food vendors mistakenly think they don’t have enough time, money or other resources to invest in Facebook promotions. The problem with this thought process is it doesn’t require a full-time social media coordinator nor much of a budget, if any.

The adage “keep it simple” goes a long way on Facebook, and with that in mind, here are ten Facebook marketing tips for food truck owners to us to maximize your presence on Facebook with minimum resources.

10 Facebook Marketing Tips To Maximize Your Presence

Manage your expectations

Set realistic goals for your approach to social media and you won’t be disappointed. Don’t expect to get thousands of fans within your first month, but think more along the lines of a two or three digit number. Then if you hit something larger than you originally anticipated, you’ll be pleasantly surprised and that will give you momentum.

Make the time

Unless you can find an intern willing to plan your media campaigns for free, cultivating a Facebook presence doesn’t have to be a full-time job nor something that eats up all your free time. Try to set aside an hour a day to work on your business’s page, post updates and communicate directly with customers and fans.

Learn as much as you can

Take notes based on your experiences with Facebook’s pages and other business services — at the very least, write down questions about things you don’t understand so you can make a note to look them up later. You’ll find just about anything you’re curious to know within the site’s official help center. Make a habit of reading as much as you can on this part of the site, without overdoing it.

Start with a small budget

It’s possible to promote your business on Facebook without spending anything. At some point you might get the itch to buy advertising, which certainly helps but also presents the temptation to overspend. You’re better off starting out doing small test ads to see what kind of performance you get for your money, and then ramp up when you figure out which demographics and key words you want to target.

Create a page, not a profile

Don’t open a second account on the social network to make a profile for your business. Not only does that go against Facebook’s rules but it also moves you one degree of separation away from the people who are already on your friend list. These folks are the first people you want to invite to become fans of your business’s page.

Post fun status updates

Make your profile work for your page by posting witty status updates that encourage your friends to engage with your business page. Apply that same sense of wit to the goal of one post per day to your page’s wall. If you can phrase it as a question, so much the better, because that will inspire responses from your community.

Have one-on-one conversations

Send a thank-you message right after someone clicks “like” on your page, and make a point of responding to messages and wall posts within 24 hours. Pay careful attention to whatever fans tell you on your page, and try to respond to their needs.

Don’t spam

People have gotten pretty tired of mass messaging and excessive numbers of posts filling up news feeds — don’t contribute to this noise and fans will appreciate it. When you have something to say to your followers, put it on your wall, not in their inboxes.

Create coupons and promotions

Discounts for first-time customers really work toward generating repeat business. But don’t limit the promotions to the first time someone engages with your company, lest they lose interest. Periodically put things on sale if you can, in order to keep people coming back.

Encourage check-ins

Wherever your business parks from day to day, that counts as a place on Facebook. Make a point of checking in to your current location every day even if you’re not planning to hit the streets. This will put your food truck’s name into people’s news feeds every time you punch in.

If you have any additional Facebook marketing tips for food truck owners, please feel free to share them in the comments section below, Tweet us or share them on our Facebook page.

muncie village

MUNCIE, IN – A recently passed ordinance to prohibit food trucks is causing some confusion for what is allowed and where trucks can sell.

Ricardo Licona, a senior telecommunications major and owner of Puerta al Paraiso’s food truck, said he wished the terms of the ordinance were outlined better. He said it isn’t clear where exactly he is allowed to park at which times. He doesn’t think the ordinance is going to affect his truck much and said there should be situational exceptions.

“If a business was to say they want us to go to [them] for lunch and there’s a restaurant within a 150 feet, we’re going to have to turn them down because of the ordinance,” he said.

Licona is also in the process of opening his own restaurant in the Village Promenade by mid-March. His plan to become a restaurant owner made him sympathize with proponents of the ordinance.

“Everything in business is about the location, so obviously for food trucks they got to be a little bit more respectful about the boundaries that they can cross,” Licona said. “Some people pay a premium price for their location. Like in the Village or downtown, they’re paying higher rents to stay there.”

With his business in the planning stages, he said he is neither for nor against the ordinance.

Find the entire article at ballstatedaily.com <here>

thoroughfare food truck

GREENVILLE, SC – Greenville could get a regular food truck rodeo if ideas discussed at a recent meeting between city officials and food truck owners come to fruition.

The meeting was part of the city’s efforts to reassess the ordinance City Council passed in 2013 and to hear how food trucks in Greenville were doing.

“This was just to get some feedback from the food truck industry,” said Amy Ryberg Doyle, one of the members of city council who attended the meeting. “And they gave us some pretty honest feedback.”

About 12 food trucks were represented at the meeting, along with several city officials and city council members.

Doyle said she thought the meeting was a success, and was a good starting point from which to help food trucks grow in Greenville.

Food truck owners and operators seemed to feel the same about the meeting. Neil Barley, who owns ThouroughFare with wife, Jessica, said the meeting went “pleasingly well,” and commended Kai Nelson, director of city’s office of management and budget for listening to the food truck vendors and for presenting ideas for possible changes to the current food truck ordinance.

“Jes and I attended the meeting because we want to see improvements to the food truck scene, especially in the immediate downtown area,” Barley said in an e-mail following the meeting. “We know there are a handful of events that Greenville host’s every year and we personally think we could enhance those experiences at the events.”

Bo Wilder, of Henry’s Hog Hauler, said he felt reassured by the gathering, that there were members of City Council who were supportive of food trucks and receptive to the concerns of owners like himself.

Find the entire article at greenvilleonline.com <here>

Food Truck Winter Storage

Although it isn’t quite Winter yet, recently we have noticed a few Twitter messages from food trucks around the country were preparing to shut down until Spring.

Unless your mobile food business is located in the warmer climate areas in the United States, the first frost is usually a sign that it’s time to start thinking about putting your food truck away for the winter. Proper storage of your food truck can save you a lot of work down the road.

In this article Mobile Cuisine will share a few food truck winter storage tips you should follow before packing your vehicle away for the winter. Come next spring, your vehicle will look great and perform well.

Before you begin, be sure when taking parts apart, to be organized. Keep similar parts together in a safe place where they won’t get lost and layout parts in a way that will allow you to put them back in the same order.

Food Truck Winter StorageFood Truck Winter Storage Tips

Make Safety Your Top Priority

Every vehicle is different. When it comes to maintenance and repairs always follow the vehicle’s owner’s manual. Make sure you have all of your tools and supplies before you begin – the last thing you want to do is go shopping when you have the car on the jack.

Safety should be your number one priority. Don’t smoke, drink alcoholic beverages, or wear exposed jewelry while working on your food truck. Watch out for hot objects, sharp instruments, hazardous materials and other potential safety hazards in and around your workspace. Always wear a set of safety glasses, a dust mask and latex gloves.

Do not work with a Philips when the job calls for a flat screwdriver. Substituting tools can compromise your safety.

Finally, when the fun turns to frustration or if the job requires specialized knowledge beyond your abilities, seek the assistance of a professional mechanic. The last thing we want is someone getting hurt.

Perform All Repairs And Maintenance 

Perform any known repairs or maintenance on your vehicle. You don’t want to forget and find out the hard way on the first spring drive.

Change The Oil 

Change your engine oil and filter. You don’t want contaminants that have built up in the oil to sit in your engine all winter. Change the oil again when taking the truck out in spring to remove any condensation build up in the oil pan.

Fill The Tank 

Add a container of fuel stabilizer to the fuel tank and completely fill the tank with high quality gasoline. Drive a quick 10 miles or so to work the stabilizer through the entire fuel system.

Prevent Rust 

Spray hinges, crevices, and anything shiny with a coating of WD-40 to prevent rusting. This can be wiped off in the spring with a degreaser. If you are using a rust inhibiting coating on the exterior, it should be applied now. Let the vehicle sit for a few days before washing and waxing.

Wash And Wax 

You’ll want to do a complete and thorough cleaning before storage. Wash the car, inside and out.
Wax all painted surfaces with a high quality wax.

Remove Kitchen Equipment

If your mobile bistro isn’t going to be stored in a heated area this step should be followed. If any of your kitchen equipment is not bolted down, remove it from your food truck and store it in a secure heated area.

Clean all of the remaining kitchen equipment to make sure there is no food to sit and spoil over the winter. Prop open your oven and refrigeration units to prevent mold from building up and ruining this equipment.

Wipe Down Rubber Parts 

Wipe all rubber parts and seals with a rubber dressing to stop them from drying out and cracking.

Battery Maintenance 

At the very least, disconnect the battery cables. If your storage area is not heated, it’s recommended that the battery is removed and stored indoors through the winter, but always watch for the possibility of corrosive battery acid.

IMPORTANT – Before disconnecting a battery, be sure you disarm any alarms and that you have any necessary lock codes for the stereo or other electronic equipment.

It’s important to maintain the battery to prolong its ability to hold a charge as time goes by. Battery maintenance can be done in a few different ways:

  • Trickle charge the battery every few weeks with a battery charger.
  • Use a battery charger that has a “maintain” setting so the battery is kept at the right state of charge, but not overcharged.
  • Use a 12V solar panel and battery maintainer to constantly monitor/charge the battery.

Fill Washer Fluid 

Fill your washer fluid container with winter washer fluid to prevent freezing and cracking of the fluid container.

Keep The Critters Out 

Cover or plug the exhaust tail pipe and air intake tubing to prevent rodents from taking up residence. Steel wool works well, just remember to remove it before starting the car! Some people also like to use mothballs under the hood or in the trunk to keep rodents away. It’s NOT recommended to use mothballs on the interior of your food truck.

On The Ground? Off The Ground? 

Next you’ll need to decide whether to raise the vehicle for food truck winter storage or leave it sitting on the ground. Flat spots on the tires used to be the main reason to store a vehicle raised off the ground, but with modern day tires, this has become less of an issue.  Generally, if the truck is only parked for the winter, storing it on the ground should be fine. Over-inflating your tires by 5-8 pounds can help prevent flat spotting over the winter.

If you are raising it off the ground, you’re next decision is whether or not to remove the wheels. Some people prefer to remove the wheels when storing a car, rather than have them in a high traffic garage area where your rims can be damaged.

IMPORTANT – DO NOT use the parking brake when storing a vehicle. Parking brakes can seize over months of being left on.

Cover It Up 

First, leave the windows down a few inches to let the interior breathe then cover the truck. Covers should be a breathable, snug fitting material. Tarps or plastic are not recommended.

Make Sure You Are ‘Covered’ 

Adjust your insurance accordingly. Call your insurance agent and let them know your food truck has been stored. They can recommend the appropriate amount of insurance.

Do you have any additional tips for Food Truck Winter Storage? If so, please feel free to leave a comment below, Tweet us or share your thoughts on our Facebook page.

favoriting tweets

So what is that star thing on Twitter and what does it do?

There seems to be a lot of food truck owners who haven’t really explored favoriting tweets or at least don’t see much value in starring tweets of others so here’s a quick intro to one of the most overlooked little gems of Twitter.

Favoriting TweetsWhat is a Favorite?

There is a small star under each tweet that allows you to favorite a tweet.

Everything else is open for interpretation and there lies the main problem. It isn’t readily apparent why a mobile food operator would use this. Is this a bookmark or a high five?

Favoriting Tweets: How to use them

The standard disclaimer applies: There isn’t a wrong way and this isn’t an exhaustive list.

Method 1: Save a tweet for later.

As a busy food truck owner knows keeping an eye on your twitter feed and reading the links that show up in it during the day can be a difficult task. Favortiing can help you save a link that you’d like to read but you don’t have time at that exact moment to digest the entire article. You can favorite the tweet so you can easily find it later and read it when it’s more convenient.

To see your favorited tweets just visit your Twitter profile and click on the Favorites tab.

Method 2: Show appreciation (give a little Twitter high five)

This is the method some owners I have spoken with prefer because it allows them to show appreciation to someone for their tweet without retweeting it. In my view, a retweet is for others whereas a favorite is for you and the author of the tweet.

Method 3: Create a “Reviews” archive

This is a great method for food truck owners- Favorite a tweet when someone says something nice about your product or customer service. You can use these tweets in the future on promotional displays, real and digital, and it’s a quick way to show off your positive user feedback.

Method 4: Create an archive of tweets

Twitter search is not quite as handy as most would like so if you want to create a searchable archive of tweets you can get the rss feed of your favorited tweets and plug it into Google Reader. Nifty huh?

Monitoring who is favoriting tweets from your truck

There are a couple of ways to see when someone favorites your tweets. The first 2 are the most common and the last 2 are my favorite.

1) Twitter.com now includes mentions in the tab formally known as mentions. Just make sure to uncheck the “Show mentions only” checkbox.

2) Tweetdeck will also display favorites in your replies tab.

3) Boxcar iPhone App – This app is how to get push notifications for everything Twitter. Its faster and more reliable, supports many services and comes with settings to set quiet times, sound notifications, and much more. Part of that more is the ability to get a push notification when someone favorites your tweet. It’s free and awesome. Visit Boxcar.io for more info.

4) Favstar.fm – A quirky but very useful service built completely around favorite Tweets. Authorize your twitter account to see who favorites your tweets.

So, do you favorite tweets? How do you use them for your mobile food business?

If this article encourages you to give them a try let us hear from you, or tweet this article and we might just favorite it.

NCR Silver

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