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Franchise

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SAN ANTONIO, TX - General (ret.) Wesley Clark, former NATO Supreme Allied Commander, was in San Antonio, Texas last week with Dave Danhi, founder of The Grilled Cheese Truck, a chef-driven gourmet venue, to announce a new program aimed at helping veterans start their own business. Clark and Danhi have teamed up to identify and train qualified veterans to own and operate food trucks.

wes clark grilled cheese food truck

General Wesley Clark, former NATO Supreme Allied Commander, was in San Antonio to announce a new program aimed at helping veterans start their own business. (Photo: Business Wire)

“We are bringing veterans an opportunity to have a tested and proven ownership experience with The Grilled Cheese Truck,” said General Clark. “We are one of the few franchise opportunities that the veteran skill set translates to and allows a veteran to be very successful.”

Danhi, an award-winning chef from Los Angeles, was an executive chef for more than 20 years before a back injury led him to buy an employment agency for chefs. In 2009, Danhi entered a grilled cheese competition in LA that sparked the idea for the Grilled Cheese Truck.

“I couldn’t believe the demand for grilled cheese,” remarked Danhi. “People just loved it, so I went home and started doing the research on my computer. I found that there wasn’t anything out there like this and immediately decided I wanted to pursue it.”

The innovative program pairs veterans who have a unique skill set with an experienced team of food professionals to teach them how to run a food truck. Another team will assist the veterans with bookings and select sites for stops around each city.

General Clark and Danhi introduced The Grilled Cheese Truck on July 4th to active duty military, veterans and the rest of San Antonio during the City’s official 4th of July Celebration at Woodlawn Lake Park. They fed up to 5,000 people for free as a thank you for their service to our country.

San Antonio is the first market in Texas for The Grilled Cheese Truck. The company has plans to expand to Dallas, Austin, and Houston.

The Grilled Cheese Truck has trucks in Los Angeles, Ventura/Santa Barbara, Phoenix and now San Antonio with plans to have 100 trucks across the country in the next year. For more information, visit www.thegrilledcheesetruck.com.

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NEW YORK, NY - TRIG Acquisition 1, Inc., d/b/a The Grilled Cheese Truck, a fully reporting public company, announced today the training of its first class of prospective candidates for The Grilled Cheese Truck’s future franchise operations. Each of the prospective owners is a veteran that served in Iraq or Afghanistan. The initial rollout is expected to kick off in Phoenix, AZ in early first quarter 2013.

Grilled Cheese  Truck

“The training of our initial class of franchise candidates is a significant development,” said Brian Pallas, President of Franchise Operations. “Phoenix now has facilities built to support our rollout of trucks for The Grilled Cheese Truck. As our vision for a national food chain begins to take hold, our team is working diligently to train qualified veterans that have the experience, ability and desire to become successful entrepreneurs.”

The Company’s veterans program provides qualified U.S. veterans from war zones, such as Iraq and Afghanistan, to be among the first 100 franchisees of The Grilled Cheese Truck, which has been ranked the #1 most influential food truck in America by Klout.com. General Wesley Clark, a highly decorated retired four-star general and former Supreme Allied Commander Europe of NATO, is supervising the implementation of The Grilled Cheese Truck’s veteran franchise program.

Dave Danhi, CEO of The Grilled Cheese Truck, added, “We couldn’t be more pleased with our veteran candidates. Having built upon the great success of our initial trucks in Los Angeles, our impressive social media following, and our exposure on networks like the Cooking Channel and Food Network, we look forward to expanding our operations through future franchise opportunities and becoming a national brand.”

The rollout strategy for The Grilled Cheese Truck in Phoenix and other cities in America provides qualified veterans with an established brand, a low cost of entry and a universally appealing product line as the Company prepares to expand its presence through franchise opportunities across the United States.

About TRIG Acquisition 1, Inc.

TRIG Acquisition 1, Inc. is an SEC-reporting Nevada corporation d/b/a The Grilled Cheese Truck. The Grilled Cheese Truck business plan is being launched as what management believes to be the first grilled cheese franchise operation and the first public gourmet food truck company in America. The Grilled Cheese Truck intends to capitalize on the burgeoning food truck industry through its established operations and social media strategy, with nearly 100,000 combined followers on Facebook and Twitter. The Grilled Cheese Truck was listed as the “most influential food truck in the country” by Klout.com, and the 3rd most influential “tweeter” in Los Angeles in 2012, behind the LA Times and LA Weekly, according to WeFollow.com. Included in the local, regional and national media coverage is The Grilled Cheese Truck’s exposure on The Rachel Ray Show, The Price is Right, NBC News, The Travel Channel, USA Today, The Los Angeles Times, The Cooking Channel, BBC Travel, and more.

For more information on The Grilled Cheese Truck, please visit:
www.thegrilledcheesetruck.com/investor

 

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While mobile food units go by many names (food trucks, food carts, food trailers and roach coaches) one thing is clear, they have hit the road running and there is no sign that they are slowing down. Although not a new idea by any means, the present-day gourmet food truck is a high powered marketing, social networking   and branding juggernaut.

Food truck franchise group

When the new breed of gourmet food trucks began rolling into major cities across the U.S., many wondered whether mobile food was just a fad. A study by Technomic stated that 91 percent of those polled, who are familiar with food trucks, felt that the trend has staying power. Only 7 percent of consumers who use food trucks say they expect their frequency of visits to food trucks to decrease over the next year.

This news has attracted franchisors to get into the market as well. Some of the food franchises that are taking to the road are Qdoba, Sizzler, Dairy Queen and Johnny Rockets.

According to Alisa Harrison, a spokeswoman for the International Franchise Association, a Washington trade group, “Food trucks are a natural fit for many franchises… (they are) replicable, which is one of the most important things about being able to franchise a business.” she said.

The unfortunate downside to these national chain franchises is that they usually require large sums of up front and liquid capital to become part of their team. This business model goes against the main reason most food truck owners have entered the industry (the lack of mass financial backing).

The Food Truck Franchise Group, of Chestnut Ridge, New York has strayed away from the typical franchisee market by focusing on providing a means for individuals and small business owners to buy into their franchise without breaking the bank. Their franchise fee is $25,000 and the truck cost is an additional $60-70,000. They assist the buyer with the purchase of a fully equipped truck, provide business and culinary training, a mobile app, point of sale system, marketing, and help in finding locations to park their vehicle and start selling their fare.

Robert Mytelka the founder and CEO of FTFUS says he decided to get into the food truck business after helping his cousin launch Latin Burger & Taco, a Miami food truck operation. He saw an opportunity to help people struggling during the downturn in the US economy. These individuals may include those who have lost their jobs or the returning airmen, soldiers and marines that are reentering the workforce after serving in Iraq and Afghanistan.

The company’s brand, Gourmet Streets™, offers a franchisee the choice of 6 different cuisines to be served from their food truck:

  • Gusto’s™ Food Truck Italian Cuisine
  • Chillipeppers™ Latin Asian Cuisine
  • Mambi’s™ (a dessert truck option)
  • American Fare™ (this menu includes items such as Philly cheese steaks, New Orleans shrimp gumbo kabobs as well as San Francisco sourdough sandwiches)
  • Eastside Deli™ (deli sandwiches)
  • Sizzle Stix N’Burger (grilled options served on a skewer)

Not only does Gourmet Streets provide their franchisees with a full menu (complete with recipes), their culinary advisors will help a franchisee mold their menu to best fit the community they serve. Chef Daren Bulley is the man in charge of assisting the franchisee within the areas of catering, brand development, and franchise sales. Chef Bulley, graduated from Johnson & Wales Culinary School, and has worked as an Executive Chef as well as opening an award winning catering business called Divine Providence in Providence, RI.

Knowing that a food truck is not a one person operation, the group works closely with several culinary schools and can assist in staffing the business, and training, as needed.

Their business model is simple and focused as they have done most of the upfront work for you. They provide the opportunity to express your culinary creativity in markets where gourmet food truck franchises will prosper.

The Food Truck Franchise Group’s mission is to enhance and grow the current food truck industry throughout the United States, helping those who aspire to be in culinary arts and food service, and who want to own their own business. To do this they offer individuals a turnkey system to gourmet food truck business success.

To find out more information you can contact the Food Truck Franchise Group at:

750 Chestnut Ridge Road
Chestnut Ridge, New York, 10977

Phone: 888-983-8383
Email: robert@ftfus.com
Website: http://gourmetstreets.com
Twitter: @ftfus

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NEW YORK, NY - The Food Truck Franchise Group and Gourmet Streets Brand Cuisines debuted at the 96th annual International Hotel, Motel + Restaurant Show® (IHMRS), held November 12-15 in New York City. The Food Truck FranchiseGroup welcomed thousands of visitors who marveled at a Gourmet Streets Eastside Deli Cuisine food truck which was on prominent display at the Show.

Food truck franchise group

The show attracted nearly 30,000 total trade attendees including both executives, owners and business opportunity seekers.

“The Food Truck Franchise Group was established to be a results-driven turnkey solution for starting your own business. After many years of marketing research, I believed that the time was ripe to offer a complete food truck franchise package which will enable any motivated person to start their own business.

Clearly, the need for new solutions is pressing in this economy and a food truck franchise stands heads and shoulders above starting a traditional fixed bricks and mortar restaurant location. Less expense outlay, mobility and greater potential for profitablity.

The Food Truck Franchise Group was created as a complete A to Z package which includes equipment, licenses, locations, mobile applications, operation manuals and training. The Food Truck Franchise Group does not just sell you a food truck. And we do not sell fast food. The concept is so new and inventive, that many of the Show attendees did not realize that we were selling an entire package. They had never heard of a food truck franchise being offered previously.

We chose the IMHRS as our New York Venue to showcase what a modern, clean and spectacular food truck franchise looks like. I sure did not mind that just about every attendee wanted photographs of themselves with our Gourmet Streets Eastside Deli food truck. I was happy to oblige, it just illustrates how attractive a food truck can be. The traffic at the Show was awesome and of course we look forward to more as the word gets out about The Food Truck Franchise Group” said Robert Mytelka, CEO of the Food Truck Franchise Group and Gourmet Streets.

Find the Food Truck Franchise Group website <here>

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Cooked up by epicurious entrepreneurs, the mobile food business is starting to whet the appetites of established companies.

Farhad Assari wants to start a franchise empire. The former Washington, D.C.-based investment banker envisions a day when his Sâuçá brand is stamped on restaurants, clothing lines, music and even sauces in the grocery store. For the time being, however, the ambitious entrepreneur is content to sell his Sâuçá street food out of a truck.

But this isn’t the roach coach of Health Department legend. Assari’s franchise, which opened in March 2010 and currently has four trucks in the D.C. area, is wildly popular, with lines sometimes 50 people deep and franchise inquiries up and down the East Coast.

“This is gourmet food. It’s very good quality,” Assari says. “My idea was to bring street food from around the world to the U.S. People in the U.S. see street food as dirty. I knew if I cleaned it up and made it sanitary, people would like it.”

Influential people like Assari’s concept, too. Last year, Sâuçá was named the winner of the Great Emerging Franchise Challenge, a contest judged by some of the biggest names in the franchise industry. And Assari is not alone on the road. At this year’s National Restaurant Association show in Chicago, food trucks garnered their own pavilion with six trucks–including Sâuçá’s–on the convention floor. That type of buzz has caught the franchise world’s attention. Not only are several food-truck concepts dipping their toes into franchising, but fast food and casual franchises are experimenting with a mobile presence as well.

The food-truck craze–whether it’s a bubble that will eventually burst or a new fixture on the American culinary scene–is pulling in big numbers. In a 2010 survey by Chicago-based food industry research and consulting firm Technomic for American Express, 26 percent of Americans said they had visited a food truck in the last six months, despite the fact that most trucks are concentrated in a few big cities. A popular Food Network reality show, The Great Food Truck Race, in which seven mobile gourmands try to outsell each other, has primed millions of people for mobile dining.

“Ten percent of the top 200 restaurant chains will have a mobile presence in the next 24 months,” says Aaron Noveshen, co-founder of Mobi Munch, a Los Angeles-based company that helps develop mobile platforms and runs several food trucks in California. “I can already count eight that do.”

Even if the hipster sheen fades from the gourmet food trucks, Noveshen believes they’ll still find a customer base at colleges, corporate campuses and other areas where full-service restaurants aren’t viable. Food trucks offer something that is always appealing: convenience.

“People are more time-starved than ever,” Noveshen says. “Mobile food will serve that need. It’s a fundamental thing that never goes away.”

In the franchising world, and especially at this experimental stage of the game, established businesses are testing the waters, mainly by using trucks as marketing tools. Taco BellDairy Queen, Jack in the Box, QdobaSubway, California Pizza Kitchen, Carl’s Jr., In-N-Out Burger, Fatburger and even Sizzler have put together food trucks or trailers they can use for special events or promotional purposes.

Tasti D-Lite, the frozen yogurt franchise, was inspired by franchisee Aaron Webster, who last year outfitted a van and began serving the yogurt at community events. Now the company is outfitting 10 Mobile Tastis for use by franchisees throughout the system. Gandolfo’s New York Delicatessen is using trucks to get a feel for new markets as it begins offering franchises across the country.

Mauricio Acevedo, CEO of Banna-Strow’s Crepes & Coffee, a four-unit crepe franchise in the Miami area with plans to expand this year, doesn’t have to be convinced that food trucks are worthwhile. The company just began offering trucks as a franchise option. “For us, getting into the food-truck business was the next logical step,” Acevedo says. “A truck highlights all the advantages of our concept. We don’t have a kitchen, and everything happens on a griddle.”

Once BannaStrow’s trucks get rolling, they will likely develop regular stops or routes as customer awareness increases. “Our main opportunity is college campuses. We can literally take our restaurants to where students are,” he says. “Some campuses are so big students can’t make it to the food court. But they can pick something up from our truck and take it into Law 101.”

The convenience factor is something Thomas Jones and his sister, Cheryl, also focused on after buying their first Cousins Subs franchise in Franklin, Wis., a suburb of Milwaukee, in 2007. The shop came with a truck, which the previous owner had used mainly for catering. But Jones, who had managed sub trucks for Cousins at festivals and special events in the late 1990s, decided to put his into full service, bringing sandwiches to the business parks in the area on a set schedule.

Find the entire article <here>

 

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