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Marketing

four walls marketing

Increasing sales is the top goal of most food truck owners I speak with. To do this, it requires that the vendor focus their effort. All too often, food truck owners look for a quick fix to increase customer traffic, turn to creative advertising campaigns, hoping they will provide the “cure-all” needed to bolster sales.

There is much more to marketing than just advertising, however. In fact, nearly 80 percent of all marketing takes place outside of your food truck.

Four Walls Marketing For Food Truck Owners

Four walls marketing is a practice used by restaurant owners, and although your customers do not sit down inside your truck, the same type of marketing strategy can be used by food truck owners. The idea behind this marketing involves the physical appearance of the business, the attitude and appearance of your employees, and the type of experience you create for your customers.

Unfortunately, many mobile food business owners spend time on social media advertising campaigns to bring customers up to their service window only to have them disappointed by their experience.

At best, social media advertising creates short-term customer traffic. Four walls marketing, on the other hand, creates long-term customer loyalty, assists in building customer frequency and creates a solid reputation for your mobile food business. Evaluate the condition of a four walls marketing plan for your truck by asking yourself the following questions:

  • Does the appearance my truck provide an environment that I would feel comfortable in as a customer? Is my truck clean? Is the sidewalk or parking area clean? An clean environment around your truck can become the place of outstanding customer experiences.
  • Are my menu items made with the highest quality and consistency? Believe enough in your food products to inspire others to believe in them too. Because your reputation is at stake, you should tolerate nothing less than perfection.
  • Does my staff project a positive, enthusiastic, customer-minded attitude? This is the most critical element. The people who staff your business determine the ultimate success of your mobile food business. Instill in your staff that building relationships with customers is the business of doing business.

If you weren’t able to answer yes to all three questions, you need to make the necessary adjustments so you can. If you answered yes to all three questions, congrat.

Now, take an extra step and ask the real decision-makers; your customers. Customers tend to see things from a different perspective than you do. If your customers’ answers match your own, you’re on the right track.

Because everything relates to the customers’ experience, don’t just settle for customer satisfaction. The best strategy you can adopt to lead your food truck business to success is to strive to exceed your customers’ expectations.

Once you’re using an effective four walls marketing plan as your primary effort in marketing your food truck, you can supplement it with other strategies.

After Instituting Four Walls Marketing

A creative advertising plan is a necessary element to promote your mobile food business, and there are “no-cost” strategies that can help increase sales. Two of the most effective are:

  • Suggestive selling: With some simple training and follow-up, your staff can increase sales without adding a single customer. Find an item that can be offered to complement what is already being purchased. If you are successful in suggestive selling only one of 10 customers, it can have a tremendous impact on your truck’s annual sales.
  • Upsizing/upselling: If you offer more than one size for your menu items, suggest the bigger size, then let the customer decide. Most people want the bigger size; they are just waiting for someone to persuade them. Again, you will increase sales without adding a single new customer.

By using an effective four walls marketing plan and supplementing it with advertising and other creative strategies, you’ll be well on your way to achieving your food truck goal for increased sales.

Have you applied a four walls marketing plan to your food truck marketing strategy? If so, we’d love to hear your results. You can share them with us via email, Facebook or Twitter.

increase food truck sales

An easy way to increase food truck sales numbers is through the presentation to your customers and the words you use.

You know when you step up to a food truck or walk into a restaurant and reading the description of a menu item makes you drool? The dish you just have to order because of how great it sounds? That is exactly what you want to happen when someone walks up to your truck.

Make effective use of adjectives and enticing descriptions to explain each menu item, especially higher-priced items. Your description need to makes people’s mouths water at the thought of eating your food.

Include mouth-watering descriptions to describe everything from soups, appetizers and desserts, as ordering these items helps boost each customer’s check.

Increase Food Truck Sales Through Menu Descriptions

Some may say, “It’s just coffee!”  Instead try, “It’s hot, freshly brewed coffee.”

You say “cheesecake.”  Try this, “Our rich, creamy New York style cheesecake that’s topped with strawberry syrup.”

You say it’s your “soup of the day.” You could say, “It’s our original homemade vegetable soup.”

Which is the way you or your service window staff present your menu offering? By adding descriptive words into your sales presentation, your customers will have a better picture of what you’re selling. And, if you do it right, they’ll end up ordering whatever you want them to order.

Words As Metaphors For Taste

Your menu can help increase food truck sales, more than anything else.

Here are a few tips:

  • Be as specific as possible as you write the descriptions of food items. You have to convey tastes, smells, emotions and overall feeling while enjoying the food.
  • Get the reader excited to learn more about the food item. You want to entice the reader to want the item immediately.
  • It should seem that no other item on that menu can have an effect similar to the one particular item that you are reading about.

These are the keys to making your menu increase food truck sales even more so than any advertising.

Do you implement special words or phrases when describing your menu items to help you increase food truck sales? We’d love to hear some of your favorites. You can share them via email, Twitter or Facebook.

virtual assistant

There are currently more than 38,000 food trucks and street vendors across the U.S., according to the latest data from IBIS World. If you ever want a visit from Guy Fieri and “Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives,” your customers need to rave about you—and you need to be in your food truck, giving them exceptional food and service. See how a virtual assistant can do that annoying desk work for you, so you can stay out in front of your customers and do what you love to do.

food truck virtual assistant

The Role of a Virtual Assistant

A virtual assistant (VA) is someone with a number of skills who can cover various roles in your business. There are VAs who specialize in a particular area, such as accounting or social media, but many function like a resource to whom you can go for almost any business need.

Bookkeeping

Poring over receipts at the end of the day is not something you look forward to. Hire a VA to pick up your receipts and maintain your books. Using cloud-based bookkeeping software, your assistant can update your information for you to review the next day. The VA can manage your payroll, expenses and taxes, too.

Email and Phone

While you’re working on the food truck, your virtual assistant can handle your business email and phone calls. He or she can contact you about only the most urgent items and summarize the rest for you to respond to later. As with many of the VA responsibilities, this one doesn’t require the person to be local. Many of the tasks you give virtual assistants can be given to people residing all over the country.

Research

Hire a virtual assistant to research the best places in the city to locate your food truck. The VA can uncover statistics such as business in the area, population, demographics—all the data you need to make this decision. A VA can collect the data and summarize it for you to review. Whether you have one or more trucks, knowing where to go to find your customers is key to your business and growth.

Marketing

Designing and producing marketing campaigns is another role that a virtual assistant can do for you. Let your VA create and print brochures about the fresh ingredients you use or the catering services you offer, and let him or her help promote your business.

Social Media

Your social media sites are a good way to promote your food truck and let people know where it will be. Your virtual assistance can manage the posts and create fun and interesting contests for your customers. A “Guess Where The Truck Will Be Tomorrow” contest encourages customer to post their guesses on your page. The first customer to guess correctly gets a free lunch. Your VA can handle all of the details of your social networking remotely.

Website Management

Your virtual assistant can also help maintain your website. They can update menus, post your blogs or articles and link your site with your social media traffic. Keeping your website fresh and interesting is another way to bring customers out to experience your particular cuisine.

Do you have experience in working with a virtual assistant for your food truck business? We’d love to hear your thoughts on this issue.

You can share your tips and ideas via email, Twitter, or Facebook.

word of mouth

Word of mouth marketing will always be the best form of promotion any mobile food industry operator can expect to achieve. For this reason, the staff at Mobile Cuisine Magazine has decided that we needed to look at the two most commonly used forms of word of mouth marketing; on and offline word of mouth.

Today, in part 1 of this series will look at the oldest and most reliable form of word of mouth marketing that almost everyone is accustomed to, we will be referring to this as “offline” word of mouth.

To start things off let’s ask you some questions to get you started thinking about creating word of mouth recommendations for your mobile business.

Why should anyone talk about your food truck or cart in a positive way?

Do customers talk about your mobile eatery if your food was good?

Do they talk about your business if your service was good?

In most cases the vast majority of people do not spread good things about a food establishment if the customer receives the type of food and service they expect.

Do customers talk about tell others if your food or your service was bad?

When customers receive poor quality food or bad service, this is when many people make sure to let others know about the issues that they have had with a particular food truck or other variation of street food vendor.

Now that we have established that a business owner is unlikely to get positive word of mouth with good service and food, yet very likely to get negative word of mouth for poor service or food, we can conclude that positive word of mouth is much harder to achieve and negative word of mouth is almost an absolute given.

The big question many will have is, why the difference? It is rather simple if you spend any time thinking about it. It is in our human nature to hold onto anger longer than pleasure. We tend to discuss the reasons we are upset far more than why we might be happy about something. Being frustrated or upset by a situation will burn deeply into our memory and we will tend to overreact.

In these cases, the food truck business the primary loser. Yes, the customer may have felt slighted, but ultimately, the business will take the brunt of their frustration in the long run. It often doesn’t take more than a small incident to create bad feelings, particularly when your customer has had a bad day already. You and your customer service staff must be aware of what our customers are seeking. Be understanding and alert as awareness and intuitiveness are key ingredients in customer service. Great customer service comes from paying attention and sensing the moods of everyone that steps up to your truck.

Turning around a situation is well within the bounds of well trained and understanding staff, so all is not lost.

How to create powerful word of mouth is a whole study in itself, but the basics are common sense and logical.

Very often just providing good service or food is not enough to encourage word of mouth recommendations; after all, these things are expected. There needs to be additional reasons for wanting to bring up the subject of where you ate last night and how good it was. Obvious examples are special occasions, such as Valentine’s Day. This could trigger conversations like, “What did you do last night?”…”Oh, we went to <insert your food truck name here>, wonderful food, really fast and friendly, you should definitely try it sometime.”

Although a nice comment, even this type of statement may not attract someone to follow their friend or acquaintance’s recommendation. For word of mouth to be effective it has to have some passion and excitement in it. That means your customer has to have been excited by what they experienced. This, in turn, means that your customer will want to instigate a conversation, rather than just respond to a question they may never be asked.

Hopefully this will make sense to you. Try to remember the last time you were wowed enough by a product or service to start a conversation about it. Very often these situations are few and far between.

How are you going to create sufficient excitement so that your customers want to tell the world? If your customer service is full of passion, that carries over to your customers and can be infectious. Without the passion in your service, how do you expect your customers to get excited? So that’s your starting point, customer service that is full of passion and fire.

Next, ignite the fires of passion in your customer, get them involved and encourage them to join the party. It is much easier to get parties of four or more people to get into the mood. Couples are different, they may well be in their own world. Individuals need more personal attention. Therefore it makes more sense and it is much easier to encourage parties of four or more to become your advocates.

With a little encouragement you should be able to create some word of mouth activity from at least 1 or 2 of the party. Ask if you can take some photos of them in the party spirit. Tell them you would like to place the photos on your customer wall board as well as your blog. (You will need their permission to do this) Offer to email copies of the photos to each of them, so that they can share them with their friends.

For individuals and couples, give them a couple of your business cards each and ask them to pass the cards to a friend or colleague who would appreciate your kind of hospitality, food and service.  Incidentally, we recommend a specially printed card for this purpose. It is very rare for a restaurateur to do this and they really are missing an out on an opportunity.

Manage and meet customer expectations all the time. How do you do this? Back up your brand’s claim or promise each time. A good example is:

  • Maintain your price range within the level your buyers expect, if you need to increase prices make sure you communicate this to them with a little justification of why you need to do so.

Customer service is the framework where loyalty and trust is built on. This is where your company can really stand out in a different way from your competition. Quality customer service is simply going out of your way to please the customer. It is that extra effort, one sincere action, the personal touch that ultimately affects buyers choice to keep remembering you and recommending you.

In part 2 we will be discussing how to utilize the power of word of mouth online; we call this word of mouse.

Keep an eye out for part 2 to be published within the next week. In the meantime if you would like to share how you encourage word of mouth, go ahead and let us know via the comments button below.

Part 2

facebook marketing tips

Recent studies have found that mobile food vendors mistakenly think they don’t have enough time, money or other resources to invest in Facebook promotions. The problem with this thought process is it doesn’t require a full-time social media coordinator nor much of a budget, if any.

The adage “keep it simple” goes a long way on Facebook, and with that in mind, here are ten Facebook marketing tips for food truck owners to us to maximize your presence on Facebook with minimum resources.

10 Facebook Marketing Tips To Maximize Your Presence

Manage your expectations

Set realistic goals for your approach to social media and you won’t be disappointed. Don’t expect to get thousands of fans within your first month, but think more along the lines of a two or three digit number. Then if you hit something larger than you originally anticipated, you’ll be pleasantly surprised and that will give you momentum.

Make the time

Unless you can find an intern willing to plan your media campaigns for free, cultivating a Facebook presence doesn’t have to be a full-time job nor something that eats up all your free time. Try to set aside an hour a day to work on your business’s page, post updates and communicate directly with customers and fans.

Learn as much as you can

Take notes based on your experiences with Facebook’s pages and other business services — at the very least, write down questions about things you don’t understand so you can make a note to look them up later. You’ll find just about anything you’re curious to know within the site’s official help center. Make a habit of reading as much as you can on this part of the site, without overdoing it.

Start with a small budget

It’s possible to promote your business on Facebook without spending anything. At some point you might get the itch to buy advertising, which certainly helps but also presents the temptation to overspend. You’re better off starting out doing small test ads to see what kind of performance you get for your money, and then ramp up when you figure out which demographics and key words you want to target.

Create a page, not a profile

Don’t open a second account on the social network to make a profile for your business. Not only does that go against Facebook’s rules but it also moves you one degree of separation away from the people who are already on your friend list. These folks are the first people you want to invite to become fans of your business’s page.

Post fun status updates

Make your profile work for your page by posting witty status updates that encourage your friends to engage with your business page. Apply that same sense of wit to the goal of one post per day to your page’s wall. If you can phrase it as a question, so much the better, because that will inspire responses from your community.

Have one-on-one conversations

Send a thank-you message right after someone clicks “like” on your page, and make a point of responding to messages and wall posts within 24 hours. Pay careful attention to whatever fans tell you on your page, and try to respond to their needs.

Don’t spam

People have gotten pretty tired of mass messaging and excessive numbers of posts filling up news feeds — don’t contribute to this noise and fans will appreciate it. When you have something to say to your followers, put it on your wall, not in their inboxes.

Create coupons and promotions

Discounts for first-time customers really work toward generating repeat business. But don’t limit the promotions to the first time someone engages with your company, lest they lose interest. Periodically put things on sale if you can, in order to keep people coming back.

Encourage check-ins

Wherever your business parks from day to day, that counts as a place on Facebook. Make a point of checking in to your current location every day even if you’re not planning to hit the streets. This will put your food truck’s name into people’s news feeds every time you punch in.

If you have any additional Facebook marketing tips for food truck owners, please feel free to share them in the comments section below, Tweet us or share them on our Facebook page.

Food Truck Branding Basics

Every food truck operation is a brand, whether it’s a single taco truck parked on the side of the highway or part of a huge national brand.

The brand is essential for your food truck to survive, it defines everything your truck stands for; it differentiates it and allows all advertising and marketing messages to revolve around it.

Food Truck Branding Basics

Why is it important to have a strong brand?

If you don’t have a brand your food truck is merely an empty shell. You haven’t positioned yourself in the consumer’s mind. If you don’t activate a brand in the correct way you have an empty and meaningless promise sitting out there.

What are the key elements to developing a food truck brand?

Your food truck brand is about every aspect of your mobile business. You have to look at the experience your customers receive when they visit your truck, food, messaging, etc.

When you are branding, or redefining your brand, you have to understand who your primary and secondary audiences are and what the needs and wants of those audiences are.

What you have to find is differentiation.

How does a food truck differentiate itself?

It starts in your tagline. Does your tagline resonate with your market? If you are a pizza truck who promotes fresh products, your tagline must explain that. Does it say you don’t make your sauce from paste that has to be rehydrated in the store but from real tomatoes that have been picked.

What are some big mistakes made when branding?

The big one is a lack of a differentiating position. Sometimes mobile business owners go with the big campaign but haven’t really looked under the hood and looked at whether their campaign really connects with the primary and secondary market with which they want to resonate and don’t ask whether [their brand] is really showing what they want to stand for. They also don’t judge themselves critically.

How do you find out whether your food truck brand and your messaging connect with your primary and secondary markets?

A food truck must look at who is the audience and who is the direct competitive set. Then you do some research. Find out who has the most propensity to eat with you, break the sub groups down, men/women, young/old/middle aged, with kids/without kids, etc.

Then you define your audience. This is absolutely an art and a skill in the world of marketing and advertising. With this information your food truck brand can maximize your reach.

How can you reinforce your brand without overdoing it?

I don’t think you can overdo it ever. If you look at consumers today they are overwhelmed with messaging so if you’re not out there messaging often to your primary and secondary audiences, you’re not resonating with them and your brand will not thrive.

Why is consistency important within a brand?

If you fracture the message you confuse consumers because they don’t know what you stand for.

Become a recognizable fixture in the local mobile food community with careful branding design. Remember to keep your messaging on point with your food truck’s personality. Use your branding to put a positive face on your mobile business and advertise a taste of what customers can expect to enjoy.

Do you have any additional food truck branding basics you think we missed? We’d love to hear your thoughts. You can share them in the comment section below, Tweet us or share them on our Facebook page.

food truck newsletter

Loyal customers love to keep up-to-date with their favorite food trucks. Mobile food vendors have the unique opportunity to communicate with their customers via newsletters. They show your customer base that care about your employees and customers to go above and beyond when it comes to communications.

First and foremost – decide whether you should implement a hard copy, email version, or both. You can use the same content across both of these platforms. Have in-house copies for customers to snag when leaving your service window. Ask loyal customers if they would prefer to receive an exclusive e-newsletter with special coupons or perks.

10 tips to creating an effective food truck newsletter for your customers:

Regular Communication

In order to be perceived as credible, you must communicate regularly and consistently. A monthly or bi-monthly newsletter is appropriate for most mobile food operations. You can adjust the quantity based on the amount of content you can generate without adding an extra element of work or stress to yourself. However, once you decide, do your best to keep true to your pattern of posting. Consumers prefer to know what to expect, so try your best to cater to their expectations.

Visually Pleasing

Add photographs of events, customers, chefs, or specials of the month. Also consider implementing snapshots of your Facebook or Twitter feeds highlighting customers’ positive feedback or a positive rave about a particular dish on the menu.

Be sure the layout is aesthetically pleasing as well. For branding purposes, utilize the food truck’s colors and logo. Find the perfect balance between content and photos. Content heavy pieces are less likely to be read than those that have a combination of both photos and writing.

Make it Easy to Digest

In addition to the layout being visually pleasing, break up text-heavy sections by utilizing bullet points of subheadings. The content should be readable, using average language and avoiding jargon.

If your readers are overwhelmed, they will bypass these sections, regardless of how rich or engaging the content may be.

Clickable Links

Make your newsletter as user friendly as possible by making your links clickable. For example, always have your Facebook or Twitter accounts linked on your e-newsletter.

Make sure you always add a link to your menu. If there is not enough space to upload photographs from an event, you can add a hyper linked keyword that directly links to an ancillary photo site, such as a Flickr account. If you have been featured on Mobile-Cuisine.com or a local blog, link to it.

Social Media Icons

Always include any social media platforms you are a member of, such as Facebook, Pinterest, Twitter, Instagram and or Foursquare. Even if it is not an e-newsletter, add small icons that represent these sites along with the URL. They will remind your customers that you have a presence on these various social media platforms.

Probe them to interact with you by providing an incentive such as a check-in on Foursquare. For example, checking-in 5 times unlocks 10% off of your meal.

Add Boilerplate Info

Your food truck has a history, even if it be short and sweet. Give your mobile food business a little personality by adding a brief, but interesting background of your truck.

List Upcoming Events and Specials

Dedicate a section of your food truck newsletter – preferably the same location for consistency purposes – that lists upcoming events and the specials of the week or month if you have planned them out in advance.

If possible, include photos to entice customers to join you for the next special menu item or event. Spice up your descriptions and vary your content to keep readers engaged.

Include a “Spotlight” Section

Food truck customers love a human element to writing pieces. Make your star employees and customers feel special by adding a “Spotlight” section.

You can create a Q & A interview, feature article, biography or simply a “Getting to know____” to create a more humanized feel to your food truck newsletter.

Call-to-Action

As mentioned previously, give your readers a reason to not only read your article, but also go a step beyond. For example, if customers sign up for an e-newsletter, they will receive 5% off their next visit or a free meal on their birthday.

Add a hidden code to bring to your food truck for an exclusive deal only offered to those who read the newsletter.

Be Creative

Your customers are your brand ambassadors, so maximize your resources. If you have given them a reason to love your food truck, they will continue to be an advocate for you.
Ask them to forward the newsletter to a new friend and they will receive a free appetizer or dessert.

Customers love to be informed and feel as if they are a part of your family; therefore, the main purpose of your newsletter is to engage with your customers in a different way, while still leveraging it as a marketing ploy. Food truck newsletters are a fairly cost-effective and unique way to communicate with employees and customers alike.

Do you have anything else to add to this list that you include in your food truck newsletter? If so, share your thoughts in the comment section below, Tweet us or share them on our Facebook page.

understand marketing

Making great food isn’t the only ingredient a mobile vendor must use to create a successful food truck today.

Here is a short list of why these mobile chefs should understand marketing and how it affects their food truck business.

10 Reasons You Should Understand Marketing
  1. To ingrain your food truck in the community.
  2. To promote your signature menu items.
  3. To stand out and be the consumer’s choice when they go out to eat.
  4. To create consumer-friendly menu items that sell.
  5. To understand consumer’s likes and dislikes and understand trends.
  6. To advertise your special events.
  7. To publicize yourself, your menu, and your food truck.
  8. To communicate what makes your menu and mobile food business unique.
  9. To generate interest and initiate new customer visits.
  10. To build a loyal following of customers that spread the word.

Food truck vendors absolutely need to know how to prepare a fantastic meal for their customers, but at the same time, they need to understand why marketing their mobile food business will help them stay open for the long haul.

Do you have any additional tips why it’s so important for food truck owners to understand marketing? If so, please feel free to share them in the comment section below, Tweet us or share them on our Facebook page.

free google business listing
Many food truck operators seem to neglect any type of online business marketing for their truck if it isn’t part of their social media strategy on Twitter or Facebook. Unfortunately, those who do miss out on a fantastic way to be discovered outside of those channels, Google. Today we’ll discuss how to setup a free Google business listing for your food truck.

For those unaware, a first page listing on Google search results is the Holy Grail when it comes to search engine marketing.

Many companies invest large sums of cash to appear on the first page by advertising through Google Adwords. For example, to achieve the top ad position when a user searches for “seafood New York,” the advertiser is paying $2.35 each time someone clicks on their ad. This can become very expensive very fast. Wouldn’t it be better if there was a way to appear on Google for Free?

The good news is, there is, and Google wants you to do it.The Google Local Business Center is designed as a way for local business owners to provide information about their business, so Google Maps can deliver more relevant findings. But in the Google tradition of ‘more is better,’ it goes far beyond a simple location description.

This is an essential online marketing tool that is provided to your food truck business for nothing.Beyond listing your business, you can add important business information including your phone number, website, description, category, payment options, business hours and service area.

But it doesn’t stop there. You can also add photos and videos, and now they also give you the option to provide both printable and mobile phone coupons.

And here’s where it gets really interesting because they provide information on your results – how many viewed your listing, what actions did they take, and where did they come from. And did we mention this doesn’t cost you anything?

Here’s how to take advantage get a free Google business listing:

2. Click on “Get on Google” button
3. Sign In with your Google account. If you don’t have an account, it’s simple and Free to sign up for one.
4. Click on the “Add New Business” button.
5. From there, you start adding your information. It’s as easy as that. We suggest listing your food truck business’ mailing address because at this point there is no means to provide your mobile locations which may change daily.

The results appear with the “Local Business Results” map that you often find at the top of a search. Take the few minutes it takes and add your food truck to Google Local. We promise, it is well worth the time spent.

Do you have any other tips to sign up for a free Google business listing for other food truck owners? If so, please feel free to share them in the comment section below.

customer satisfaction survey

Did you know that it costs three times more to acquire a new customer than to keep an existing customer happy?  Customer satisfaction survey cards can help you keep your existing food truck customers.

Very rarely do food truck customers speak with their mouths, they speak with their feet. When they’re unhappy, they simply don’t come back. Why? Could be bad service, price increases or a change in portion size. Most food truck vendors will never know.

Don’t spend big bucks on mass mailers, newspaper ads, and weeknight specials to attract new customers. Focus on keeping the customers who already know and love you. And if something does go wrong, set up systems to intercept unhappy guests before they walk away from your truck.

A well-executed customer satisfaction survey card system gives you the vital information you need, shows that you care about your customers, and offers a simple, hassle-free way to give feedback—good or bad.

Be creative. Design a customer satisfaction survey card that people will want to complete. Include a section for rating food, service and setting. Another section should include a space for short answer, open-ended questions. The last section should ask for customer information. Here’s where you can start building a valuable data base.

Sample Customer Satisfaction Survey:

Please rate the following areas on a scale of:

1 – Unacceptable
2 – Needs improvement
3 – Fair
4 – Good
5 – Excellent

Your server:
Friendly
Knowledgeable
Prompt

Food:
Portions
Taste
Presentation

Cleanliness:
Truck
Line/Queue area

Menu:
Variety
Description
Prices

Other questions to include:

What did you order today?

How often do you visit the truck?

  • First time
  • 1-4 times a year
  • 1-2 times a month
  • Once a week or more

Would you like to be on our email mailing list?

Please add any other comments that will help us improve your dining experience.

Encourage your customers to fill-in the card completely by giving incentives such as a complimentary dessert on the next visit. Birthday and anniversary “treats” are good incentives too.

You’ll increase frequency of existing customers simply by asking these questions and offering a “thank-you” gift to be redeemed at a future date. And equally important, if something goes wrong, you have the chance to make it right…almost immediately. Don’t let that customer walk away from your food truck for good.

Do you have any other suggestions or tips for the use of customer satisfaction surveys? We’d love to hear from you is you’ve got experience in this area. Please feel free to add your thoughts in the comment section below, Tweet us or share them on our Facebook page.

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