Home Tags Posts tagged with "Provo"

Provo

0 423
provo city hall

PROVO, UT – Mobile food businesses were given some new marching orders Tuesday: Stay out of downtown Provo, unless invited for a special occasion.

The Provo Municipal Council approved unanimously, with two council members missing, an ordinance on licensing and regulating food truck vendors, what they can and cannot do, and where they can do it.

Highlights of the new regulations include the following:

  • Food trucks will not be allowed in the downtown area without special permission from the city administration, exceptions would be allowed for special events in the downtown area.
  • Food trucks will be allowed adjacent to city parks with approval from the parks director.
  • Background checks will be done on food truck owners and drivers but not on all employees.
  • Multiple food trucks will be allowed to operate on the same street.

Those missing were chairman Hal Miller and council member Gary Garrett.

“I feel the document we have come up with is very good,” said councilman Stephen Hales.

Members of the brick and mortar restaurant owners group, truck vendors and other downtown residents met during the past two weeks to agree on what is good for everyone.

Discussion considered how federal law may prohibit restriction on the free markets and how food trucks can be kept from the Center Street area.

The accepted distance is a 100-foot radius from the main entrance of a brick and mortar restaurant. However, the number of restaurants and the type of parking available already is very prohibitive in the downtown area.

One suggestion included the city’s mayor signing off on exemptions for trucks in the downtown area.

“Overall I’m not excited about exemptions coming to me,” Mayor John Curtis said. “That’s all I would be doing — approving exemptions.”

Some discussion included using a neighborhood chair to help.

Council attorney Brian Jones said, “The intent only applies to the downtown neighborhood chair. All of legal staff have concerns about a prohibition district. We’re creating a district in which food trucks cannot enter, except on special occasions. Granting power to grant exceptions is taking away the power of the administration.”

Find the entire article at heraldextra.com <here>

1 543
Provo Downtown

PROVO, UT – Laws already on the books make it so mobile food vendors can’t park on Center Street and University Avenue. However, Provo restaurant owners would like food trucks to keep their distance and stay in other less-competitive locations.

That doesn’t mean the public feels the same way. At least 68 percent of respondents surveyed by the city say they like having the trucks available. The food trucks believe when it comes to special events like the Rooftop Concert series, there should be a spot for them.

At Tuesday’s Municipal Council work session, council members discussed these topics and possible changes to a city ordinance that would regulate food trucks, where they could park and other safety factors.

Amendments to the code could enlarge the radius area in which a food truck can park from the front door of a brick-and-mortar restaurant from 100 feet to a suggested 200 feet. With 56 restaurants in downtown, those circles could put them right out of the downtown business hub.

On March 4, the council asked city staff to find out what residents think. A total of 807 responded to a city online survey and through the city newsletter. Sixty-six percent said they visit a mobile food business at least once a month, while 68 percent said they would like to see more trucks. That same percentage would be more likely to visit downtown if there were more trucks there. Seventy-one percent said they would like to see the trucks at city parks.

While it was a very positive result from the food trucks’ point of view, Dean Judd, a board member of the Downtown Restaurant Association, said he thought the survey was one-sided.

“Food trucks are mobile for a reason,” Judd said. “They are designed to go where restaurants are. They should target other locations. Residents don’t know what owners go through to stay open. They shouldn’t be allowed in downtown Provo.

Find the entire article at heraldextra.com <here>

0 551
Food Truck News

In our quest to keep our readers up to date with the latest stories relating to the food truck industry we have compiled a list of the stories that hit the wire this past weekend from New York City, Milwaukee, Provo, Portland and Worthington.

May 23

As New York City Crushes The Food Truck Business, Mexicue Pushes A New Model – NEW YORK, NY - The arrival of food trucks to New York several years ago was greeted by a City hungry for refined street food, willing to pay higher prices to reward hard-working culinary entrepreneurs.  But, what was initially a story of success, as the Mexicue truck can attest, quickly became a nightmare riddled by surging competition, conflicting and arbitrarily enforced regulation, and dwindling profits.

Find the entire article <here>

Owner of food truck that caught fire speaks out – MILWAUKEE, WI - The owner of a food truck that went up in flames on Milwaukee’s south side is struggling to get back on his feet to support his wife and three kids.

“As days go on, I feel it more and more… not having a job, not having income for my family,” said Francisco Hernandez, about losing the food truck that he called “How many for you?”

Find the entire article <here>

May 24

The explosion of Provo’s food truck scene is mouth-watering – PROVO, UT - When Christian Faulconer opened a Sweeto Burrito in Provo last summer, he joined a very short list — basically, a handful — of food trucks in the area.

Now less than a year later, Provo’s food truck landscape has changed drastically.

Find the entire article <here>

May 25

Building boom displacing food-cart pods – PORTLAND, OR - Portland gave the world the concept of the food-cart “pod” — clusters of mobile eateries stationed semi-permanently in parking lots.

Now, one by one, Portland is taking the pods back.

Find the entire article <here>

May 26

Worthington getting first taste of food trucks – WORTHINGTON, OH - Driving through the heart of Worthington recently, Sharon Powers did a double-take.

“Was that a food truck — in Worthington?” she recalled thinking.

It was. And it will continue to be there, one night a week, for at least three months — all part of Worthington’s first flirtation with the growing food-truck trend.

Find the entire article <here>

best food truck graphic ad
Give-Network-Ad 2