Tags Posts tagged with "SC"

SC

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horry county courthouse

HORRY COUNTY, SC - You won’t see mobile food trucks rolling around Horry County anytime soon, but a pilot program to test allowing them to operate in the county is making its way through Horry County government committees.

Thursday afternoon the Horry County Mobile Food Vending Ad Hoc Committee met and approved a “working ordinance.” That ordinance will go to the planning committee and at least one other committee before making its way to the full Horry County Council for its vote, according to Steve Neese, the chairman of the committee.

The ordinance, as it is currently written, would allow for a year-long trial program in the county. Fifty permits would be issued the first year. If it is successful the program could be expanded, he said.

The ordinance calls for the trucks to be inspected by the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control and fire officials, Neese said. The employees would also have to pass background checks, and the site of operation for the food truck would need to be approved, Neese said.

Neese said this ordinance will take two to three months to make its way to the full county council, but he said Thursday’s approval is “starting the process.”

Find the original article at carolinalive.com <here>

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greenville food trucks

South Carolina breweries are getting acclimated to the new “Stone Law” that provides more flexibility in how they can serve beer — and they say they’ll soon turn toward a familiar partner in hopes of making the most of it.

Food trucks.

The Upstate’s mobile food establishments — the likes of Ellada Kouzina, ASADA, Henry’s Hog Hauler, Chuck Truck — set up shop at breweries every week, both for special events and regular service.

This symbiotic relationship is one seen across the state and the country as both industries grow and innovate.

Recently, state Legislators passed a new law allowing production breweries to sell more beer on site — and the beers of others — so long as they provide food service.

The requirement is set out broadly, enough so that simply having a food truck on site can help satisfy the food-service provision, said Brook Bristow, a Greenville lawyer who represents the South Carolina Brewers Association and helps brewers navigate the state’s peculiar beer production laws.

“The greatest thing about this is the flexibility,” said Bristow, who helped write the Stone Law, an effort by brewing advocates, economic developers and legislators to attract Stone Brewing Co.’s eastward expansion from San Diego.

Greenville breweries have yet to move on the provision, though most say they are seeking clearance from state regulators as they try to use their breweries as revenue-creating destinations.

The default law that breweries operate under — which was passed last year — allows for a three-pint limit per day.

Meanwhile, the state awaits a decision by Stone Brewing on whether the nation’s 10th-largest craft brewer will expand to South Carolina.

The state Department of Health and Environmental Control is responsible for permitting food service, and the law allowing breweries to serve food finds brewers dealing with a new agency.

Find the entire article at greenvilleonline.com <here>

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GREENVILLE, S.C. —The operators of the food truck that led the way for others in the city of Greenville made a shocking announcement on their Facebook page Monday.

Neue South Portland

Neue Southern Food Truck owner and Chef Lauren Zanardelli’s post says,

“Graham and I have some news we’d like to share with you. It’s kind of a bomb, so I’m just gonna drop it. Graham and I are moving to Portland, Oregon this spring. We know this comes as a huge surprise. It’s all happened extremely quickly. What seemed like some vague, distant idea became a reality overnight, and we’re still in a state of shock ourselves!

“Graham and I knew when we started our business that our future would always be a little unpredictable. From the time we opened until now, we’ve been asked what our next step will be, and that question, at best, has been met by us with shrugs. We’ve known that in a few years time we want to be working toward opening our brick and mortar restaurant. But until recently, we didn’t know what the years in between would hold. We spent the last six months exploring every possible direction. What can I say. We’ve both dreamed about one day living on the west coast. And we’re so fortunate to have this opportunity to spend a few years in a progressive culinary city. We’ll be learning and absorbing everything we can before we move back east to kill it in OUR restaurant. We feel like we need to take it.

“Bittersweet is too ineffectual a word to describe this move. Still having so much we want to learn, we’re ridiculously excited to be moving to a city that revolves around its dining culture and has city blocks lined in mobile eateries. And at the same time, I cry like a baby when I think of what it’s going to mean to say goodbye to all of you as this adventure comes to a close. I struggle to find the words… I’ve rewritten this post more times than I care to publicly admit, and every time I reread it, I hate it. It just doesn’t begin to do our feelings justice.

“We know how much this sucks for our fans, but we hope that you can be happy for us. It’s not going to be even a little easy to leave, so we could really use your support! It would make a world of difference for Graham and me. We seriously don’t know what we’ll do without you. Our very last service is on Saturday, March 15 at The Community Tap –the parking spot that brought our truck to Greenville, and the place where this all started.

“We hope we get a chance to see and feed all of you these next two weeks. But it’s not goodbye yet! We’re going to make the very best of every minute we have left on our truck. You’ve made this the most remarkable experience of our lives to date. To say we love you for it barely scratches the surface.  Cheers to you, Greenville.”

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