Tags Posts tagged with "Truck"

Truck

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free google business listing
Many food truck operators seem to neglect any type of online business marketing for their truck if it isn’t part of their social media strategy on Twitter or Facebook. Unfortunately, those who do miss out on a fantastic way to be discovered outside of those channels, Google. Today we’ll discuss how to setup a free Google business listing for your food truck.

For those unaware, a first page listing on Google search results is the Holy Grail when it comes to search engine marketing.

Many companies invest large sums of cash to appear on the first page by advertising through Google Adwords. For example, to achieve the top ad position when a user searches for “seafood New York,” the advertiser is paying $2.35 each time someone clicks on their ad. This can become very expensive very fast. Wouldn’t it be better if there was a way to appear on Google for Free?

The good news is, there is, and Google wants you to do it.The Google Local Business Center is designed as a way for local business owners to provide information about their business, so Google Maps can deliver more relevant findings. But in the Google tradition of ‘more is better,’ it goes far beyond a simple location description.

This is an essential online marketing tool that is provided to your food truck business for nothing.Beyond listing your business, you can add important business information including your phone number, website, description, category, payment options, business hours and service area.

But it doesn’t stop there. You can also add photos and videos, and now they also give you the option to provide both printable and mobile phone coupons.

And here’s where it gets really interesting because they provide information on your results – how many viewed your listing, what actions did they take, and where did they come from. And did we mention this doesn’t cost you anything?

Here’s how to take advantage get a free Google business listing:

2. Click on “Get on Google” button
3. Sign In with your Google account. If you don’t have an account, it’s simple and Free to sign up for one.
4. Click on the “Add New Business” button.
5. From there, you start adding your information. It’s as easy as that. We suggest listing your food truck business’ mailing address because at this point there is no means to provide your mobile locations which may change daily.

The results appear with the “Local Business Results” map that you often find at the top of a search. Take the few minutes it takes and add your food truck to Google Local. We promise, it is well worth the time spent.

Do you have any other tips to sign up for a free Google business listing for other food truck owners? If so, please feel free to share them in the comment section below.

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food truck sales

In a mobile food business, food truck sales are what will determine if you are able to make it through your first year of operation. Projecting your future food truck sales is a critical step in ensuring that your business is profitable.

Before you open, it is definitely worth it to have an idea of whether or not your sales will support your business needs. Pulling a number out of thin air does nothing for you, and although there is no actual formula for projecting sales for your start up  making a well-informed guess is critical to planning your first-year funds. We have put together some guidelines for estimating the amount of funds you can bring in from your mobile food truck or cart in its first year.

food truck sales

Do not base your estimations on how many people you can serve with your truck or cart at full capacity, since this may be unlikely for your first year of business.

Figure out how many customers you can serve and then plan for about 75% of that case. Pay attention to your area demographics. People may flock to a similar cuisine food truck in the area already, but may not be excited about going to yours, or vice versa. A lot depends on your concept and where or when you will be serving the public.

Determining Your Food Truck Sales

Estimate Customer Numbers

By now you will likely have a few specific areas you plan to use as regular locations, or at least a general idea. A great way to learn about how many of walk up customers you may expect is by comparing your potential business to existing mobile kitchens in the area. Visit trucks or carts of similar size and cuisine type.  Although these businesses may turn out to be your competitors, you can obtain valuable information by observing how many covers they serve during peak hours. You may even speak with the owner to learn about how many covers they see in a week.

Estimate Average Spending Per Customer

Once you have a customer count estimate, you will need to come up with a per person average based on your menu prices. Make sure you use middle-of-the-road cost values from your menu to figure this out. That means choosing moderately-priced menu items in lieu of the least pricey or costliest. After all, you cannot expect all of your guests to buy the most expensive item on your menu every time. In general, your sales are a function of how many people you serve and how much they spend.

Also, be sure to take in to consideration the difference in number of customers and per customer spending averages for different meal periods. For example, lunch periods tend to bring in lower average sales than dinner periods, unless you are able to find locations to park in central business district where there is a lot of foot traffic and hungry workers. Days of the week will also bring in different sales as well. For example, Thursday nights are usually more profitable for food trucks than Monday nights.

Generate a chart showing estimated number of customers per meal period each day, as well as the per person spending average.

Estimate Food Truck Sales for the Year

After mapping out sales projections for the week, some mobile food vendors will merely multiply their weekly sales totals by 52 weeks to get a year’s sales projection. Other owners will divide the year into seasons to reflect the business they will receive during different times of the year. This is a little more complicated because seasons vary depending on region, but it can be more accurate since some months are usually busier than others. Think about what an average week’s sales might look like, and then ask yourself what you might make in the work of a slow week and in the work of a busy week.

Consulting seasoned food truck employees or owners in your area will help you to decide what kind of traffic or sales volume to expect at different times of the year. These estimations will vary from truck to truck, depending on your menu and your locations. After even a few months of operating, you will have a much better idea of what to anticipate as far as sales go, and you can alter your estimations accordingly. You should also evaluate your operations and promotion efforts if sales are not matching the projections in your business plan.

Running a mobile food business is no small endeavor, and you are more likely to succeed when you have done the appropriate research and made some rational estimates. Figure out what you might expect as far as visitor attendance and sales per person by checking out the competition and determining what is rational for your idea, location and customer demographics. This will also help make sure you are financially prepared for the revenue your rolling bistro will bring in during the course of your hard first year.

Do you have any additional tips to help determine your food truck sales? If so, please feel free to share them in the comment section below, Tweet us or share them on our Facebook page.

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food truck tip of the day

tip of the day

Today’s mobile food businesses need to recognize that customer loyalty goes a long way. Continually re-evaluate your approach to customer service.

  • Take some time and effort to provide meals based on various dietary needs or allergies. Expanding your customer base through simple changes to some of your favorite menu items can be as easy as swapping out some ingredients for others.
  • Use social media to notify your loyal customers about up-coming specials to keep them coming back.
  • Make all of your customers feel like a member of your food truck family.

These simple changes or additions to your current customer service plan can help pave the road to continued growth of your food truck business.

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food truck parking tickets
Image Credit: www.nycfoodtrucks.org

Every municipality has its own parking regulations you need to know while you are operating within their city limits. Ignorance of the law is usually no defense against a food truck parking ticket, especially if the police were notified by a restaurant who felt you were parked to close to their storefront.

food truck ticket

Parking tickets in the mobile food industry have become extremely common, partially because they’re easy laws for you to break without being aware of it and also because they make a lot of money for the city. With that said they are the sort of trouble that can be easy to avoid having to pay.

Dealing With Food Truck Parking Tickets

City governments love their parking tickets, so much so that many of them get handed out even if you didn’t break a law. To avoid paying for these tickets the first thing you want to check for is a mistake.

According to parking expert Eric Feder, if anything on the parking ticket is wrong (from the date to the location to the cited violation) you have an easy way out. You can even get out of a ticket if the writing is illegible. If anything is off or wrong on your citation, contest it and you should be able to get it dismissed without much trouble.

If a mistake was made and the citation was real, you’re not necessarily out of luck. Sometimes street markings are confusing or unclear. If that’s the case, photograph your parked food truck, the area around it, and any relevant signs to show as evidence for when you’re in court. You can’t argue ignorance to the law, but if the law can’t be easily understood you can argue that.

You’re also in the clear if your parking violation was the result of an emergency. For example, if your engine overheated and you had to run to a store to get water or antifreeze to cool it off, your receipt can be used as proof to show what you were doing when the ticket was issued.

This is the case for virtually any emergency, so long as you have proof. Technically you could fake an emergency to get out of a parking ticket, but you should really try an honest approach. Most judges are pretty good at detecting lies, so think twice about trying something dishonest.

We hope this article will help a mobile vendor get out of having to pay for a food truck parking ticket they either did not break any law to receive or merely received because the street markings were confusing.

Not only can the fees for these tickets become expensive, but they can get your food truck on the radar of the local ticketing officers who may spend more of their time looking for your truck to give you additional tickets later on. Food truck parking tickets can be the bane of a vendors existence due to the fact that if they want to fight them, it requires that they take time out of the truck to fight them.

Do you have any additional tips on how to beat a food truck parking ticket? If so, please feel free to share in the comment section below, Tweet us, or share them on our Facebook page.

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food truck menu

In our consistent attempts to assist mobile food vendors across the country, Mobile Cuisine Magazine has produced a number of articles aimed at both new and existing vendors in areas that are most likely to effect the operation of their business. Today we have dedicated our writing to one such area, food truck menu building.

food truck menu

A good menu design is one of the ultimate goals to any mobile food vendor’s marketing plan. If done properly, it will expresses your eatery’s personality, focus your overall operations, promote you businesses profitability, establish your budget and keep your brand fresh in your customer’s mind.

What is the goal of a well-crafted menu?

Your menu is your primary means of businesses representation: It says exactly who you are and what you hope to convey personality-wise. It also should create enough of an impression so that it stays with your client long after they have ordered from it. In addition, it must convey your brand in a manner that makes diners excited to visit, want to come back and recommend it to family and friends.

What steps should you take before designing your food truck menu?

As with most creative endeavors, proper results can’t be achieved without sufficient research. In the case of designing the right menu for you, that means collecting data from various sources. Examine your own numbers first, such as your food truck’s prospective financial and marketing numbers and its sales mix.

Then look at your competitors: Examine their Web sites, menus and marketing efforts and try to see where they went right and how you could compete successfully with those traits.

After that, consider your typical locations and how they relate to the customers you attract. Knowing all of this, ask yourself the following:

  • What can my mobile restaurant menu offer that others in the area do not?
  • What menu items do we have in common?
  • How does our pricing match up?
  • Does my menu offer more variety than theirs?

Determining these factors will help guide you towards designing the right menu for your food truck or cart.

How should you design your food truck menu?

There are no rights or wrongs in mobile food vendor menu design. What works with some establishments will fail at others. However, as mentioned before, your menu should be an expression of your businesses personality. In designing it, think about how it will best represent your image and objectives. Are you classy and sophisticated? Fun-loving and wild?

A small, simple menu can be used to enhance a truck’s impression of elegance or simplicity. A long, item intensive menu can emphasize your festive side. Once you determine personality you wish to achieve, you can easily begin crafting the look of your menu to match that.

How should you arrange items on the menu? Should you use merchandizing techniques to help?

Design your menu in a way that mimics the dining experience. Arrange items sequentially, with appetizers, salads and soups first, then entrees, then desserts. Place star items on boards that contain more visual flair than others, and set markers or images around featured items to further draw attention.

Merchandizing techniques will further help this agenda and create a menu by allowing you to easily spotlight specialty and signature items, introduce newer selections and invoke an appropriate sense of personality. In turn, the techniques also make these items easier for your clients to find and recognize.

food truck menu boardWhat are some tips you can use to design your mobile restaurant menu?

Place your best selling items, or those you want to have the biggest draw, on the prime sweet spots of the menu board. These areas refer to the spots where the average customer brings his or her eyes to first, and thus receive one’s first attention.

Also, if room on the board allows, arrange your menu in columns. One column can reflect a sense of sophistication and elegance, where two or more columns can bring forth a sense of playfulness, etc.

Highlight spotlight or signature items in a way that draws attention to them: Boxing selections off within your menu works well at this, as does adding colors, images, labels and logos.

Naming items specifically or creatively (ex. Rojo Chicken Salad), and using active descriptions of the ingredients in the dishes, makes the food sound more enticing and exotic for the customer.

What are some common mistakes in food truck menu design?

If your menu creates problems for your customers, they may become apprehensive and less likely to return. Common mistakes include: Menu print that is too small to read easily; menu boards that lack English translations for non-English words or phrases; menus without daily or weekly special insets; entrees that don’t look like their photos; and misalignment of brand and menu.

How should you price your food truck menu?

Food truck diners are savvy, and often they’ll know how your items match up value-wise against your competition. In light of this, keep your more everyday items (dishes you can find anywhere, really) approximately $1 more or less than your competition.

Many customers do not perceive such increments to be significant, especially with dishes above $5, so there is some leeway there. Likewise, items unique to your truck or cart can be a little higher but also should not exceed the other items excessively. Doing so will make the latter more enticing to diners, especially those who visit your establishment regularly.

Also, to get a better feel for the sense of value you are promoting, take a picture of each item on the menu in a way that mimics the actual presentation on the table. After doing so, ask yourself: Do the items look like they are worth the price you are charging?

Could a change in presentation justify an increase in price? Is there consistency with the overall look or does there seem to be a wide range or inconsistency in the price versus its presentation? You’ll be amazed at what you discover when you look at the entire menu collectively through the customer’s eyes.

How often should you update your food truck menu design?

To keep your menu fresh, relevant and profitable, you need to know how each item is performing and how it stacks up against your competition. Conduct an analysis of your menu every six to twelve months.

During this evaluation, look at profitability analysis and competitive menu analysis and determine what works best and what isn’t working at all. Then make the proper adjustments so that your changes reflect your research.

Comparing your food truck menu with that of your competitors also helps. It not only opens more doors towards pricing your menu, it offers you a solid foundation on how to measure your profits. Performing a cross analysis helps uncover strengths and weaknesses in your pricing plan, specifically in terms of the way your items are priced and presented.

By doing this, you determine which items are most popular, which are most profitable, which need extra emphasis, and which need to removed or replaced.

We hope this article will help both new and existing mobile food operators maximize their businesses marketing plans by creating a food truck menu that shows who you are and coveys this with your current and prospective customers.

Outside of your truck’s wrap or your carts graphics, you menu is the first glance into your operation that a person on the street is going to have of your business. Do not squander this opportunity by putting up a menu that is hard to read or does not express the type of chef you are, or the food that you have created.

Did we miss something in regards to food truck menu design? Feel free to share your thoughts in the comment section below, Tweet us or share your ideas on our Facebook page.

 

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Mentoring For Food Trucks

Many food truck owners start off with the perfect menu but very little practical business experience. That’s why SCORE (Service Corps. of Retired Executives) provides mentoring for food trucks.

SCORE is a nonprofit association dedicated to helping small businesses grow (including those in the mobile food industry) and achieve their goals through education and mentorship.

Founded in 1964, the organization boasts approximately 400 chapters across the United States. There are four types of mentoring that a current or prospective food truck owner can use, face-to-face, over the phone, by email and teams. They cover the gamut of small businesses and if one mentor may not specialize in one aspect of running a mobile food business, they can easily put you in touch with someone who can.

Their mentoring members cover a wide number of skill set areas, everything from senior management to technical skills to operational human resources.

Their mentors are heads of organizations and have worked for powerful companies. In addition to the weekly mentoring available, SCORE offers low cost classes such as, “The Buzz About Creating Your Own Business,” “How The Right Information Can Make You A Lot Of Money,” “Get More Customers With A Great Marketing Strategy,” and “Making Your Business Profitable, How To Find The Cash In The Cushions.”

These classes are designed to take a novice and teach them how to get all the key tools in place to ensure they’ll be successful. SCORE mentors present the information as well as provide the necessary steps to implement it. For food truck business owners looking for mentoring on a less structured business, SCORE also offers mentoring by appointment which varies from city to city.

The Treats Truck – NYC

For Kim Ima, it was love at first sight – not with a person, but with the idea of the Treats Trucks. Kim wanted to spend her days baking delicious cookies, brownies and other treats and then serve them on the streets of New York, her adopted home town. “It combined my love of baking, my love of treats and my love of the city,” Kim says. “The more I thought about the idea and how it could evolve, the more I wanted to do it.”

There was only one problem; Kim had no idea how to get her idea rolling.

Kim went to SCORE and researched potential volunteer mentors before she requested a meeting with Elliot Merberg. It was then that Kim’s vision was closer to becoming a reality and ultimately did become just that.

Kim worked with Merberg on a wide range of startup issues and other things she needed to consider as she put together the business plan for Treats Truck. “Sometimes when I met with Elliot and he didn’t know the answer to a question, he simply asked someone else to come over and help us,” Kim says. “There were always plenty of people with specific experience to draw on.”

Merberg also helped Kim manage the emotional ups and downs that come with starting a new business. “When I got over-enthusiastic, such as wanting to start with two trucks, he’d advise me to slow down and focus on starting with one,” Kim says. “When I got frustrated about something and was too hard on myself, he’d show me how things were actually going OK.”

Become a SCORE Mentor and provide mentoring for food trucks

Are you, or have you been, a food truck owner? Do you enjoy sharing your experience to others?  Are you willing to commit 10-12 hours per month assisting other culinary entrepreneurs start or expand their mobile food business dream?

If so, SCORE would love to talk with you. You could join a team of local mentors who counsel clients throughout the country, one of which is probably close to you.

To become a SCORE volunteer, go to www.score.org. Or follow them at Twitter@SCOREMentors We hope you’ll consider joining the ranks of 13,000 other volunteers nationwide and become a SCORE mentor and help the mobile food industry continue to grow.

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2014 RAM ProMaster

Food trucks are here to stay, no matter what some bloggers have written.  And after visiting the North American International Auto Show (NAIAS) in Detroit last week, it’s clear that the automakers want in on the food truck industry.  I had the pleasure of speaking to two different automakers that are definitely familiar with and looking to promote their commercial offerings to the mobile food industry.

Food trucks aren’t really new in this industry because automakers have been serving food to the media at the Los Angeles Auto Show for a couple of years.  The difference is that more manufacturers are taking a more serious look at this industry with its commercial truck and van segment.

The NAIAS is typically home to major product announcements and launches with global automotive media in strong attendance.  The products on display are primarily consumer automotive while other large shows around the country have a higher concentration of commercial vehicles on display.  Having said that, I was excited to see the Ram ProMaster proudly displayed on the main aisle in the Chrysler family of brands booth.  I was happy to sit down with Robert Hegbloom, the Director of Ram Brand Marketing, to discuss their plans with the Ram ProMaster as it relates to the food truck industry.

Hegbloom believes this product is a smart choice for food truck industry professionals.  Its best-in-class features set it apart from the competition.

I’ve seen all sorts of food trucks around the country and on television.  I’ve spoken to several owners about how they’ve retrofitted their trucks to fit their needs and the problems they’ve had because the truck wasn’t built with their specific needs in mind.

I could rattle off the best-in-class of features directly from the Ram ProMaster media kit, but I’d prefer to elaborate and bring some of it to life for practical food truck purposes.

The fuel economy, cargo capacity and payload are great features.  Fuel economy is key when having to move around several times or make several trips to and from your commercial kitchen to restock or travel long distances to see your customers.  The payload can hold up to 5,145 pounds of equipment and supplies.  The towing capacity can haul up to 5,100 pounds of additional supplies, or your portable smoker and more.

This is the only vehicle in its class with front-wheel drive.  Because of this, the Ram ProMaster is able to offer the lowest step-in height and highest standard ceiling height.  As a food truck owner/operator, you’ll have headspace to work while the lowest step-in height means comfort and reduced fatigue and risk of injuries while getting in and out of the truck.

The front-wheel drive also offers some ease of driving and handling because most of us are used to that in our everyday driving.

The Ram ProMaster is a great utilitarian commercial vehicle whose corporate offices are taking notice of the food truck industry.  It was developed from the successful, long-standing Fiat Ducato.  It has 30+ years of reliable service and more than 4.5 million units sold.

Ram Truck is well known for being the most upfitter-friendly brand in the truck market.  That’s good news for kitchen builders and food truck owner/operators that can work closely with their preferred dealers to customize their kitchens.  Let’s keep in mind that while a full kitchen will fit, the equipment will most likely need to be smaller in scale to fit in this space.  If your kitchen equipment needs and operational staffing are minimal, this can be the right vehicle for you.  Watch for the Ram ProMaster at your local Hotel, Motel & Restaurant Association and various food/restaurant related shows in the future.

Other vehicles in this segment are the Nissan EV, the Ford Transit Connect, and the Mercedes-Benz Sprinter.  All of them bring different features to the party and all are solid commercial vans for food truck use.  They will all be discussed over the next few months.

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pierogi fun facts

The internet is full of fabulous facts about everything from current events to the history basket weaving. Because of this, as we research for our daily content on food trucks, food carts and street food, we stumble upon some items of knowledge that we just did not know. We have decided when these fun facts pop up, that we would share them with our readers in our section titled “Did You Know?”

For today’s Did You Know we will look at Pierogi fun facts.

Pierogi Fun Facts

The Facts: Pierogi are boiled, baked or fried dumplings of unleavened dough traditionally stuffed with potato filling, sauerkraut, ground meat, cheese, or fruit.

  • The word pierogies is popular in the U.S. and Canada because it underlines a ‘plurality’ of this well-known Polish food. However, this usage is not so appropriate since in fact the word ‘pierogi’ is already plural in Polish language.
  • Pierogi enjoyed a brief popularity as a sports food when Paula Newby-Fraser adopted them as her food of choice for the biking portion of the 1989 Hawaii Ironman Triathlon.
  • October 8th is National Pierogi Day.
  • The Pittsburgh Pirates baseball team organizes a ‘pierogi race’ during their games. Four types of pierogi called Sauerkraut Saul, Cheese Chester, Jalapeno Hannah and Oliver Onion take part.
  • A small village Glendon, Alberta, Canada unveiled its roadside tribute to Ukrainian pyrogy in 1991. Glendon’s pyrogy is a huge statue of one pierogi put on the fork. The statue is 25-foot height, weights 6000 pounds and is made of fiberglass and steel.
  • The largest edible pierogi was made during Pierogi Fest in Whiting, Indiana. It was a 92-pounds huge pierogi.
  • In November 2005, a woman claimed she had an image of Jesus Christ seared into the side of a pierogi she made. Her family placed the pierogi on eBay and netted $1,775.

Pierogi Fun Facts We Missed

If so, please feel free to let us know in the comment section below. We always love to add to these lists. If we can verify that the facts is just that, a fact, we will give the reader credit in the article.

Reference: Wikipedia: Fun Facts about the Pierogi.

 

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PHILADELPHIA, PA - Last week, I heard that Philadelphia was getting the Philadelphia Public History Truck. I wasn’t sure what a Philadelphia Public History Truck was, or why a Philadelphia Public History Truck was something that Philadelphia needed, so I reached out to its co-founder, 28-year-old South Jersey native and Temple graduate student Erin Bernard, to find out.

Philly Public History Truck
Image from phillymag.com | Mark Krendel

So what the heck is the Philadelphia Public History Truck?
It’s a mobile museum going from neighborhood to neighborhood in Philadelphia, and the idea behind it is that instead of having a public history exhibit where academics have constructed it, the exhibit is community curated. So all of the community members are invited to come together and contribute and share their stories and objects to put into an exhibit.

Why haven’t I seen this on the street yet?
Right now, we’re in our first exhibit cycle in East Kensington. I’ve done oral history interviews, and I have objects that community members have given me. We’re doing a storytelling block party and First Friday at the Little Berlin fairgrounds in October, where I’ll be serving apple cider and pie and taking oral histories.

So when you say it’s a history truck, are we talking like a food truck, a semi?
The truck was a post office truck. Then it was a water ice truck. And we acquired it through the East Kensington Neighbors Association. The president of EKNA, Jeff Carpineta, he gave it to us. He’s been incredibly helpful. I love the truck. It says “Touch of Philly” on the front.

Find the entire article by Victor Fiorilla at The Philly Post <here>

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Charles goodnight

Cattleman and inventor Charles Goodnight was born on March 5th in Texas. As a tribute to the man who may be the one individual most responsible for the food truck industry we have today we have put a short biography together for you.

Charles Goodnight: The Man, The Myth, The Legend

Charlie Goodnight, also known as Charlie, was born with the Texas Revolution. He came to the state from Missouri the year Texas entered statehood, and, later, with a handful of men, invented the American ranching industry and the chuck wagon. He is sometimes known as the “father of the Texas Panhandle.” Essayist and historian J. Frank Dobie said that Charles Goodnight “approached greatness more nearly than any other cowman of history.”

The chuck wagon (a cowboy’s portable kitchen wagon used on the cattle trails) was invented by Goodnight in 1866 by using an army surplus Studebaker wagon to create what is considered by many as the first food truck. Goodnight purchased the government wagon and had it completely rebuilt according to his specifications in seasoned bois d’arc, the toughest wood available.

The distinguishing feature of the wagon was the sloping box on the rear with hinged lid that lowered to become a cook’s worktable. The box was fitted to the width of the wagon and contained shelves and drawers for holding food and utensils. Since early 17th Century England, individuals involved in the meat business referred to a lower priced part of the beef carcass as the “chuck.” To the cowboys, “chuck” was food, so the box was called a chuck box and the wagon became known as a chuck wagon.

charles goodnightMost chuck wagons had the same basic design. They were large, sturdy, four-wheeled wagons with bows across the top covered with waterproof sheets. There was usually a cowhide stretched beneath the wagon bed and fastened at the corners; it was used to carry wood or cow chips.

Chuck wagon food was comprised of black-eyed peas, beans, corn and cabbage. Of course, there was lots of beef and bison steaks and stews spiced with chilies, garlic, and onion or the occasional catfish or shrimp caught from the rivers, lakes or coastal waters. Sourdough breads (sourdough bullets), quick biscuits, skillet corn bread and cowboy coffee were served with the meals.

The chuck wagon was drawn by oxen or mules. The wagon usually carried food, eating utensils, a water barrel, as well as tools and bed rolls, all tucked away in drawers and shelves and covered by a canvas covering. A hinged counter that folded out was used for chopping and preparing the food.

Without the chuckwagon’s creation by Charles Goodnight, not only would the trek Westward changed, but who knows if there would be a mobile food industry like we have today.

More on Charles Goodnight can be found at PBS.org <here>

 

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