Authors Posts by Richard Myrick

Richard Myrick

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Richard is an architect by degree (Lawrence Technological University, Southfield, Michigan) who began his career in real estate development and architectural planning. In September of 2010 he created Mobile Cuisine Magazine to fill an information void he found when he began researching how to start a mobile hotdog cart in Chicago. Richard found that there was no central repository of mobile street food information anywhere on the internet, and with that, the idea for MCM was born.

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cake fun facts

The internet is full of fabulous facts about everything from current events to the history basket weaving. Because of this, as we research for our daily content on food trucks, food carts and street food, we stumble upon some items of knowledge that we just did not know.

We have decided when these fun facts pop up, that we would share them with our readers in our section titled “Did You Know?”

For today’s Did You Know we will look at Cake fun facts.

The Facts: Modern cake, especially layer cakes, normally contain a combination of flour, sugar, eggs, and butter or oil, with some varieties also requiring liquid (typically milk or water) and leavening agents (such as yeast or baking powder). Flavorful ingredients like fruit purées,nuts, dried or candied fruit, or extracts are often added, and numerous substitutions for the primary ingredients are possible. Cakes are often filled with fruit preserves or dessert sauces (like pastry cream), iced with buttercream or other icings, and decorated with marzipan, piped borders or candied fruit.

  • In Roman times, eggs and butter were often added to basic bread to give a consistency that we would recognize as cake-like, and honey was used as a sweetener. The distinction between Roman concepts of cake and bread was therefore very blurred.
  • November 26th is National Cake Day.
  • The proverb ‘you can’t have your cake and eat it’ first appeared in the early 16th century, however, the proverb ‘a piece of cake’ was not coined until the 20th century and is possibly related to the cakewalk competition.
  • The word ‘cake’ comes from Middle English kake, and is probably a borrowing from Old Norse.
  • The meaning of ‘cake’ has changed over time, and the first cake was: A comparatively small flattened sort of bread, round, oval, or otherwise regularly shaped, and usually baked hard on both sides by being turned during the process.
  • In Scotland, and parts of Wales and northern England, cake took on the specific meaning of ‘a thick, hard biscuit made from oatmeal’.
  • The world’s largest wedding cake weighed 15,032 lb and was made by chefs at the Mohegan Sun Hotel and Casino, Uncasville, CT in February 2004.
  • Birthdays used to be celebrated quite differently, as the first birthday cake was originally a cake given as an offering on a person’s birthday. The first reference to ‘birthday cake’ came in 1785.
  • During the 17th century, in England, people believed that keeping fruitcakes under the pillow of those who are unmarried will give them sweet dreams about their fiancee.

Cake Fun Facts We Missed

Please feel free to let us know if we may have missed some cake fun facts in the comment section below. We always love to add to these lists. If we can verify that the facts is just that, a fact, we will give the reader credit in the article.

Reference: Wikipedia: Fun Facts about Cake.

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Unsuccessful Food Truck Owners

Over the years we’ve provided some fun articles which point out key traits we’ve witnessed in some of the most successful food truck owners in the country. Today we are going to reverse things a little and go over the the common traits of unsuccessful food truck owners we’ve seen in the mobile food industry in the 4 years of Mobile Cuisine.

15 Traits Of Unsuccessful Food Truck Owners
  1. Vendors who say that they never have enough time for themselves or family, but who refuse to hire anyone because they do not have the ability to trust anyone else.
  2. Vendors who desperately need a marketing plan, business plan, operation plan, strategic plan, etc.,  but never seem to get around to getting it.
  3. Vendors who have high turnover and blame it on the market or the economy.
  4. Vendors who are totally reactive to circumstances.
  5. Vendors who treat all staff the same.
  6. Vendors who cannot think beyond their own experiences, and who refuse to understand that their success will be limited to their level of understanding that food trucks are a unique business model and may not be related to their understanding or experience in other industries.
  7. Vendors who do not understand that if you are not able to differentiate yourself in your market, you will fail.
  8. Vendors who do not study industry trends.
  9. Vendors who cheat, lie, steal and abuse any or all of their relationships with vendors, staff, and customers.
  10. Vendors who, find they have a great sales increase, but don’t know where it came from.
  11. Vendors who refuse to ask for help, even when they run into major problems.
  12. Vendors who take their staffs, customers, vendors or team for granted.
  13. Vendors who do not embrace change.
  14. Vendors who never seem to be ready for change.
  15. Vendors who do not understand the importance of branding their food truck business.

Please note, if you feel you have some of these traits…it’s almost never too late to change.

I’m sure there are more, but these 15 traits of unsuccessful food truck owners seem to be the biggies. Do you have any additional traits that we should add? If so, please let us know in the comment section below, Tweet us or share them on our Facebook page.

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vegan food truck customers

It’s Monday again, and for today’s Meatless Monday coverage we are going to look at individuals who have taken vegetarianism to the next level in their dietary lifestyle.

Growth in the mobile food industry is only being matched by the growth of individuals in the United States who have made the conscious effort to limit or even eliminate the amount of meat they include in their lives. There are now twice as many vegetarians in American as there were in 1994, and almost a third of them are now vegans.

vegan food truck customers

Food truck owners around the country are constantly looking to find new customers, and being able to offer the growing vegan population food from your truck is an easy way to expand your customer base.

The problem many mobile food unit operators have isn’t that they are open to expanding their menus, but that they aren’t sure what vegans can or cannot eat. Today’s article hopes to help those understand vegan food truck customers, and what they typically eat.

What is a Vegan?

As many people already know, vegetarians do not eat meat, fish, or poultry. The way the vegans differ from vegetarians is that they do not eat other animal products and by-products such as eggs, dairy products and honey.

Why Veganism?

People choose to follow a vegan lifestyle for health, environmental, and/or ethical reasons. For example, some vegans feel that one promotes the meat industry by consuming eggs and dairy products.

Many vegans choose this lifestyle to promote a more humane and caring world. They know they are not perfect, but believe they have a responsibility to try to do their best, while not being judgmental of others.

Vegan Food Truck Customer Nutrition

The key to a nutritionally sound vegan diet is variety. A healthy and varied vegan diet includes fruits, vegetables, plenty of leafy greens, whole grain products, nuts, seeds, and legumes.

Protein

It is very easy for a vegan diet to meet the recommendations for protein as long as calorie intake is adequate. Strict protein planning or combining is not necessary. The key is to eat a varied diet.

Almost all foods except for alcohol, sugar, and fats provide some protein. Vegan sources include: lentils, chickpeas, tofu, peas, peanut butter, soy milk, almonds, spinach, rice, whole wheat bread, potatoes, broccoli and kale.

Fat

Vegan diets are free of cholesterol and are generally low in saturated fat. Thus eating a vegan diet makes it easy to conform to recommendations given to reduce the risk of major chronic diseases such as heart disease and cancer. High-fat foods, which should be used sparingly, include oils, margarine, nuts, nut butters, seed butters, avocado, and coconut.

Calcium

Calcium, needed for strong bones, is found in dark green vegetables, tofu made with calcium sulfate, calcium-fortified soy milk and orange juice (I also heard that wheatgrass juice is good, tho you need a wheatgrass juicer), and many other foods commonly eaten by vegans. Although lower animal protein intake may reduce calcium losses, there is currently not enough evidence to suggest that vegans have lower calcium needs. Vegans should eat foods that are high in calcium and/or use a calcium supplement.

Other good sources of calcium include: okra, turnip greens, soybeans, tempeh, almond butter, broccoli, bok choy and commercial soy yogurt.

Zinc

Vegan diets can provide zinc at levels close to or even higher than the RDA. Zinc is found in grains, legumes, and nuts.

Iron

Dried beans and dark green leafy vegetables are especially good sources of iron, better on a per calorie basis than meat. Iron absorption is increased markedly by eating foods containing vitamin C along with foods containing iron.

Sources of Iron

Soybeans, lentils, blackstrap molasses, kidney beans, chickpeas, black-eyed peas, Swiss chard, tempeh, black beans, prune juice, beet greens, tahini, peas, bulghur, bok choy, raisins, watermelon, millet, and kale.

Omega-3 Fatty Acids

In order to maximize production of DHA and EPA (omega-3 fatty acids), vegans should include good sources of alpha-linolenic acid in their diets such as flaxseed, flaxseed oil, canola oil, tofu, soybeans, and walnuts.

Common Vegan Foods

Oatmeal, stir-fried vegetables, cereal, toast, orange juice, peanut butter on whole wheat bread, frozen fruit desserts, lentil soup, salad bar items like chickpeas and three bean salad, dates, apples, macaroni, fruit smoothies, popcorn, spaghetti, vegetarian baked beans, guacamole, chili…

Vegans Also Eat…

Tofu lasagna, homemade pancakes without eggs, hummus, eggless cookies, soy ice cream, tempeh, corn chowder, soy yogurt, rice pudding, fava beans, banana muffins, spinach pies, oat nut burgers, falafel, corn fritters, French toast made with soy milk, soy hot dogs, vegetable burgers, pumpkin casserole, scrambled tofu, seitan.

Egg Replacers:

  • 1/4 cup (2 ounces) soft tofu blended with the liquid ingredients of the recipe, or
  • 1 small banana, mashed, or
  • 1/4 cup applesauce, or
  • 2 tablespoons cornstarch or arrowroot starch.

The following substitutions can be made for dairy products:

Soy milk, rice milk, potato milk, nut milk, or water (in some recipes) may be used. Buttermilk can be replaced with soured soy or rice milk. For each Cup of buttermilk, use 1 cup soymilk plus 1 tablespoon of vinegar.

Soy cheese available in health food stores. (Be aware that many soy cheeses contain casein, which is a dairy product.)

Crumbled tofu can be substituted for cottage cheese or ricotta cheese in lasagna and similar dishes.

Several brands of nondairy cream cheese are available in some supermarkets and kosher stores.

We hope this guide gives you a better understanding on how to serve vegan food truck customers. We understand that some trucks have a very limited menu, however, being able to add at least one vegan meal to your truck’s menu will allow even more people to enjoy your truck’s cuisine.

meatless monday

Please do your part today and join the movement? Signing up is fast and easy! Follow them on Twittter.

Mobile Cuisine Magazine looks forward to sharing Meatless Monday with our readers!

 

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time clock cartoon

Food trucks have two major cost centers. One is food and beverage. The other is labor. Which do you think is most problematic for mobile food vendors?

If you said labor, either you’ve been running a food truck for at least a few months, or you have some genuine insight into the challenges of running a mobile food business.

Labor issues are typically the number one concern of most food truck owners. Food and beverage costs can be held in check through price adjustments and portion controls. On the other hand, labor costs are not controlled by paying low wages.

Controlling food truck labor costs is best done through sound scheduling and improving your employee productivity. You increase productivity through training, better food truck kitchen layouts, and the use of labor-saving equipment and products.

This article addresses cost-related issues and ways to increase employee productivity — the areas in which a mobile food vendor has the most control.

Controlling Food Truck Labor Costs: Keep an Eye Numbers

Before you can develop appropriate and effective measures for labor cost control, you must gather the necessary information on which to make your decisions. Therefore, the accumulation and reporting of relevant labor cost information is critical. To do this, you need more than your calculator.

Productivity and labor cost efficiency cannot be addressed and assessed only in straight numbers. If customer service is compromised, the initial savings of a lower payroll cost can be negated by a decrease in sales caused by customer losses.

When trying to determine the productivity of your staff, the traditional ratio of “payroll to total sales” is not an effective and accurate measure of worker productivity and scheduling efficiency.

Essentially, you pull this ratio from your income statement to tell you how much sales you are squeezing out of your payroll expense. What could be more telling? Well, there are three reasons why additional measures must be used to analyze labor costs.

The traditional labor cost ratio really just indicates to management what needs to be addressed, without providing any specific information.

The figures reported on the monthly income statement are historical and after-the-fact. Labor cost should be controlled beforehand. This will require labor cost figures to be compiled at least weekly.

So what is the best measure of productivity? There is no one magic ratio. You need to monitor several benchmarks to take the pulse of your mobile food business.

Controlling Food Truck Labor Costs: Don’t Lower Wages

Food trucks should not control labor cost by keeping salaries and wages low. In fact, operations paying less than the going wage rate in their locale will find it difficult to hire and retain the more productive employees.

Think about it. If you felt you were a very good cook or manager, would you quit your current job and go work for someone who paid you less than you were making? I don’t think many of us would work for less.

About one-third of all employees who leave a job voluntarily, leave for better pay. You may have heard that money cannot be a motivator for increasing productivity.

Well, it is probably true that just increasing the wages of an employee will not necessarily mean they will be more productive, but when money is used as a reward for outstanding performance, it can be an effective motivator.

There are a number of scheduling methodologies you can use that will reduce your labor costs just by adjusting when you have employees arrive and depart from work. Efficient scheduling must reflect the variations in business volume that occur during the day and even meal period.

Your goal is to accomplish the necessary workload with a minimum number of labor hours while maintaining your level of service.

Productive employees should be rewarded with pay increases and earn more than average employees. Treat your valuable employees like you do your most valuable customers. Realize that the labor cost per cover and the number of covers per labor hour can be improved only with productive employees.

If productive employees are treated no differently from marginally productive ones, there is no benefit to the employee to do more than average for he or she will get the same enumeration either way.

Controlling Food Truck Labor Costs: Set Benchmarks

No single measure can be used to evaluate labor productivity; management must employ multiple measures collectively. Management must have a better index of labor productivity and no single measure can efficiently accomplish that. Therefore, additional measures are needed to properly analyze labor costs. The additional information needed is readily available as it is compiled on a daily or weekly basis. These measures are:

  • Covers per labor hour
  • Labor cost per cover
  • Labor cost per labor hour

Where do you start? Each time payroll is processed, total labor hours by job category are tallied. Management will compare actual hours worked to those originally scheduled and look for variances. If hours worked are greater than scheduled hours, they will investigate to determine the job category where the variance occurred.

Employee schedules are determined not by revenue but by customer counts. The “covers per labor hour” is perhaps the best indicator of labor productivity compiled by a mobile food service operation because it is not distorted by the way sales are affected by price increases and discounts.

Although some drops in customer counts occur in the long run when prices are increased, covers per labor hour remains the most effective indicator of employee productivity.

The “labor cost per labor hour” is another productivity index. It is calculated by dividing total payroll by total labor hours. When calculated by respective employee job categories, one can readily see the wage differentials between jobs. This information can assist management in establishing wage ranges for each job category.

The third index of productivity is the “labor cost per cover.” This tells us how much labor is used to serve each customer that walks up to your food truck service window. The total payroll is divided by the number of customers.

Check out this example:

Assume:

  • Total Payroll Cost = $1,400
  • Total Labor Hours = 144
  • Total Covers Served = 1,200

Therefore:

  • Covers per Labor Hour (1,200/144) = 8.33
  • Labor Cost per Labor Hour ($1,400/144) = $9.72
  • Labor Cost per Cover ($1,400/1,200) = $1.17

Did we miss something in regards to controlling food truck labor costs? If so, please feel free to share them in the comments section below, Tweet us or share them on our Facebook page.

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fake online reviews

Fake online reviews can become a food truck owner’s worst nightmare.  Websites such as Yelp, Google Places, or even Facebook, can damage a truck’s good reputation at the click of a button.

The advancement of social media has resulted in a host of creative ways to damage a mobile food business name and the internet has become the arsenal for competitors, disgruntled and former employees.

It is thought that by the end of the year, up to 15 percent of online social media reviews could be fake, and it’s a two-way street. Some seeking positive reviews will pay to have five-star ratings while those looking to damage the reputation of another will pay for bad reviews.

Those receiving bad reviews have attempted to turn things around with paid five-star reviews, resulting in a discombobulated and completely inaccurate overview of a business. Add to that the negative reviews left by disgruntled or former employees creating more havoc and leaving a mobile food vendor to feel helpless.

How trustworthy are social media reviews to consumers?  Some reports claim that consumer trust in social media reviews is currently low.

The good news is the Federal Trade Commission is cracking down on fake reviews. Companies face litigation from the FTC for forging fake reviews.

The best way a food truck owner can take to prevent fake online reviews: Pay attention!

Without the aid of social media log-in, computer algorithm and the expense of a lawsuit, food truck owners can protect themselves from fake online reviews by close monitoring of review sites and paying attention to specific patterns in writing, such as common verbiage in multiple reviews. Be on the alert for common misspelled words and pay attention to capitalization.

Those who don’t know the proper spelling of a word will carry the misspelled word throughout each post. Some positing under various identities can be spotted by repeated punctuation errors.  There are, of course, those who are obvious repeat offenders, failing to hide their transparency with verbiage changes. Multiple posts using words such as “gross” or “sick” should trigger a red flag.

If there are suspicious reviews, you can flag the review and take the initiative to contact the website and request the reviews be authenticated or removed.  At the least, protect your mobile food business by marking the suspicious review as spam.

Remember though, that these methods are only useful for legitimate fake reviews. And they’ll only be taken seriously if the review is damaging your food truck business and appears to be fake, or written by a competing business.

Just to be clear, you can’t use any of these strategies for real reviews. If you’ve been taking a digital beating for bad service or bad food, then the obvious answer is to start impress every single person who comes to your service window so that their good reviews make the bad reviews look silly and outdated.

Please Note: Don’t waste your time or money trying to sue review sites over fake online reviews. Websites such as Yelp are protected by the Communications Decency Act. Under Section 230, and aren’t liable for any defamatory content made by its users, as they are considered third- party re-publishers of the content.

Do you have any tips on how to avoid or find fake online reviews? If so, please feel free to share them in the comment section below, Tweet us or share them on our Facebook page.

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fudge fun facts

The internet is full of fabulous facts about everything from current events to the history basket weaving. Because of this, as we research for our daily content on food trucks, food carts and street food, we stumble upon some items of knowledge that we just did not know.

We have decided when these fun facts pop up, that we would share them with our readers in our section titled “Did You Know?”

For today’s Did You Know we will look at fudge fun facts.

The Facts: Fudge is a type of confectionery, which is usually soft, sweet, and rich. It is made by mixing sugar, butter, and milk, heating it to the soft-ball stage at 240 °F, and then beating the mixture while it cools so that it acquires a smooth, creamy consistency. The product is sold in a variety of flavors, and fruits and nuts, as well as candies which are sometimes added.

  • It is believed that someone was making caramel when they “fudged” up the recipe. The result was delicious, but the name stuck even as fudge grew in popularity.
  • Another story goes, that a college lecturer in Virginia, was teaching a class in toffee making, and the temperature was not taken high enough resulting in what we now know as fudge.
  • In 1886, fudge was sold at a local Baltimore grocery store for 40 cents a pound.  This is the first known sale of fudge.
  • November 20th is National Peanut Butter Fudge Day.
  • The largest slab of fudge weighed 5,760 lb and was made by Northwest Fudge Factory in Levack, Ontario, Canada, on 23 October 2010.
Fudge Fun Facts We Missed

Please feel free to let us know if we may have missed some fudge fun facts in the comment section below. We always love to add to these lists. If we can verify that the facts is just that, a fact, we will give the reader credit in the article.

Reference: Wikipedia: Fun Facts about Fudge.

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food truck thanksgiving

In a recent report, The National Restaurant Association (NRA) shared that more than an estimated that 30 million Americans enlist the help of restaurants for their Thanksgiving feast by dining out or using takeout to serve their guests.

Just as restaurants can be used to help cater or serve their customers fresh, safe and delicious Thanksgiving meals, so can food trucks. Preparing a food truck Thanksgiving meal safely will ensure an enjoyable holiday for your customers.

Food and cooking are always a big part of holiday celebrations, so putting food safety practices in focus this time of year will help ensure a safe and enjoyable experience.

Whether cooking in your commissary or food truck kitchen, basic principles like cleaning and sanitizing, and cooking to proper temperatures should be part of everyone’s food safety knowledge base.

Here are 5 safety tips to use when preparing a Food Truck Thanksgiving meal:
  • Thaw your turkey in the fridge. While you can thaw a frozen turkey under running water or in the microwave, the best way is in the refrigerator overnight (or longer). Be sure to follow the instructions on the package.
  • Store raw turkey away from ready-to-eat food. Make sure your raw turkey is covered and stored in a leak-proof container on the bottom shelf of the refrigerator. You want to keep it away from foods that are ready to eat, such as desserts and salads, to avoid the risk of cross-contamination.
  • Clean and sanitize your sink and counters. After rinsing your raw turkey thoroughly, properly clean and sanitize the sink and surrounding area before starting to prepare any other food.
  • Cook your turkey to safe internal temperature. Use a properly calibrated meat thermometer to check that your turkey has reached an internal temperature of 165 degrees. Insert the thermometer to the dimple on the stem in the thickest part of the breast and thigh for accurate readings.
  • Keep cold foods cold and hot foods hot. Prep salads, cranberries and other colds items first and store them in the fridge until ready to serve. Then prep your hot dishes closer to serving time so they stay hot. Keep all food items outside the “temperature danger zone” (41 to 135 degrees) as much as possible.

We hope you use these food truck Thanksgiving meal tips to help prevent your customers or anyone you happen to serve safely.

Has your mobile food business served a food truck Thanksgiving menu to your customers? We’d love to hear from you and your experiences. Please feel free to share them in the comment section below, Tweet us or share them on our Facebook page.

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successful food truck owners

There is no magic formula for successful food truck owners, but most vendors who have done well seem to share the same six personality traits.

At the top of the list for successful food trucker owners is the ability to collaborate with others. Those who can delegate often build strong relationships with their staff and are more likely to click with their customers.

successful food truck owners

The other five traits frequently found in successful food truck owners:

Being self-fulfilled. The best culinary entrepreneurs put a high price on the fulfillment their food trucks provide them, relish being their own boss, and enjoy being in control of their personal income.

They value doing something for a living that they love to do being able to decide how much money they make and being able to have the satisfaction of creating something their community values.

Focused on the Future. Food truck owners who have thrived are good at both short and long-term planning. They’re as likely to have a well thought-out plan for the day-to-day running of their business as a road map for how to run the business for years.

Curious. Strong entrepreneurs are always reading and asking questions. They want to learn everything from why a particular business failed to how to find, motivate, and keep good employees.

Action oriented. Successful mobile food business owners are proactive and always differentiate themselves from their competitors. They are less worried than other small business owners about the state of the economy and more likely to look at adversity as sign to move forward.

Tech-savvy. Perhaps this isn’t a surprise but the best food truck business owners invest time and money on their website and are likely to rely a great deal on technology such as social media and point of sales systems to help make our business more effective and efficient.

Many food truck owners have some or many of these traits, however it’s the food truck owners with all of these traits that seem to have captured the most successes so far.

They are a special breed of entrepreneurs that are highly motivated, caring and curious individuals. They effectively balance their personal and business goals, take advantage of others’ expertise and continually seek to learn the best practices exhibited by their competition.

Did we miss a common trait found in most successful food truck owners? Please feel free to share your thoughts in the comment section below, Tweet us or share them on our Facebook page.

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food truck tip of the day

tip of the dayFood portioning is a main ingredient in keeping a food truck’s food cost down and keeping the products you serve consistent.

Here are 5 simple signs to tip you off that food portioning standards might not be part of your business model or if you or your staff members aren’t following those that you’ve installed.

5 Signs That Food Portioning Standards Are Not Being Used
  1. Measuring tools aren’t being used to portion food.
  2. Standards are lacking for serving bowls, plates, and cups.
  3. Customers tell you that portions are either too large or too small.
  4. Entree portions are too large and are discouraging the sale of appetizers and side dishes.
  5. Too many items are left over or used up early in a shift.

Do you have any additional signs that you use to keep an eye on the food portioning in your food truck? If so, please feel free to share them in the comment section below, Tweet us or share them on our Facebook page.

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baklava fun facts

The internet is full of fabulous facts about everything from current events to the history basket weaving. Because of this, as we research for our daily content on food trucks, food carts and street food, we stumble upon some items of knowledge that we just did not know. We have decided when these fun facts pop up, that we would share them with our readers in our section titled “Did You Know?”

For today’s Did You Know we will look at Baklava fun facts.

baklava fun factsThe Facts:  Baklava is a rich, sweet pastry made of layers of filo filled with chopped nuts and sweetened and held together with syrup or honey.

  • Baklava is the ancestor of strudel. It was brought to Hungary by Turkish invaders in the 16th century.
  • Phyllo dough is named after the greek word for “leaf”, being “as thin as a leaf”.
  • November 17th is National Baklava Day.
  • The origin of the name is disputed. Turkish etymologists claim an old Turkish origin. Others argue that the word “baklava” may come from the Mongolian root ba?la- ‘to tie, wrap up, pile up’ composed with the Turkic verbal ending ba?la-.

REGIONAL VARIATIONS:

  • In Greece, baklava is supposed to be made with 33 dough layers, referring to the years of Christ’s life.
  • In Bulgaria, Serbia and Macedonia, baklava is made with walnuts and sugar syrup.
  • In the Balkans, it is a popular dessert. It is also made on special occasions, especially by Muslims during the holy month of Ramadan and Eid ul-Fitr, and by Christians duringPascha and Christmas.
  • In Armenia, paklava is made with cinnamon and cloves.
  • In Israel, baklava is made of phyllo pastry sheets, nuts, such as pistachios, walnuts, hazelnuts, and almonds, sweet butter, clove, sugar, cinnamon, and the syrup combined with orange and lemon rind.
  • In Jordan, baklava is made of dough layers filled with nuts, such as pistachios, and sugar or honey syrup.
  • In Lebanon, baklava is made of filo pastry filled with nuts and steeped in Attar syrup (orange or rose water or sugar) or honey. It is usually cut into triangular or diamond shapes.

Baklava Fun Facts We Missed

Please feel free to let us know if we may have missed some in the comment section below. We always love to add to these lists. If we can verify that the facts is just that, a fact, we will give the reader credit in the article.

Reference: Wikipedia: Fun Facts about Baklava.

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