Understanding How FUTA Affects Your Food Truck

Food truck owners must pay federal and state unemployment taxes in order to fund the unemployment tax system. Unemployment compensation is designed to pay benefits to workers when they lose their jobs through no fault of their own.

The Federal Unemployment Tax (FUTA) fund and state unemployment funds require employers to pay taxes to fill those unemployment funds. For FUTA, employers pay a federal rate of 6.2 percent on the first $7,000 that each employee earns. Please note that you do not withhold the FUTA tax from an employee’s wages.

Understanding How FUTA Affects Your Food Truck

Is your food truck required to pay the FUTA tax? It is required to do so if during the current or the preceding calendar year you meet either of the following tests:

  • you pay wages totaling at least $1,500 to your employees in any calendar quarter; or
  • you have at least one employee on any given day in each of 20 different calendar weeks (the 20 weeks need not be consecutive, the “one employee” need not be the same individual and a “calendar week” is a period of seven successive days beginning with Sunday and ending at the close of the following Saturday; however, short weeks at the beginning and end of a calendar year are counted as calendar weeks).

Once a food truck meets either of the tests, the vendor becomes liable for the FUTA tax for the entire calendar year and for the next calendar year as well.

Each state sets its own unemployment tax rate. Many states also charge additional fees for administrative costs and job-training programs. You can check out the full charges for your state at Payroll-Taxes.com.

States use four different methods to calculate how much you may need to pay in FUTA taxes:

  • Benefit ratio formula: The ratio of benefits collected by former employees to your company’s total payroll over the past three years. States also adjust your rate depending upon the overall balance in the state unemployment insurance fund.

  • Benefit wage formula: The proportion of your company’s payroll that’s paid to workers who become unemployed and receive benefits, and then divides that number by your company’s total taxable wages.

  • Payroll decline ratio formula: The decline in your company’s payrolls from year to year or from quarter to quarter.

  • Reserve ratio formula: Your company’s balance in the unemployment reserve account. The reserve account is calculated by adding up all your contributions to the account and then subtracting total benefits paid. This amount is then divided by your company’s total payroll. The higher the reserve ratio, the lower the required contribution rate.

These formulas can be very complicated, so your best bet is to meet with your state’s unemployment office to review how your food truck’s unemployment rate will be set. In addition to getting a better idea of what may impact your FUTA tax rate, you can also discuss how best to minimize that rate.

To discuss FUTA further, leave your comments below or on social media.

2016-06-07T09:57:23+00:00 By |Taxes|

About the Author:

Richard is an architect by degree (Lawrence Technological University, Southfield, Michigan) who began his career in real estate development and architectural planning. In September of 2010 he created Mobile Cuisine Magazine to fill an information void he found when he began researching how to start a mobile hotdog cart in Chicago. Richard found that there was no central repository of mobile street food information anywhere on the internet, and with that, the idea for MCM was born.

Leave A Comment