5 Reasons To Keep Your Personal Political Views Off Social Media

Social media has been a great marketing tool for the food truck industry. With social media, food trucks and their owners can connect directly with customers as frequently as they like. However, this direct communication has to be used with caution, particularly when wading into areas that have little to do with their mobile food business. This is particularly an issue when it comes to politics. With the anger on social media these days, today we discuss five reasons vendors should keep personal political views off social media.

As a food truck owner, be thoughtful about voicing your political thoughts and opinions. I understand that everyone has their own opinions and even I have shared a few political articles on different social media networks. It’s fine to discuss politics with other people, but do that in a different setting. Just don’t do it all over social media, unless you don’t mind the risk of alienating at least half of your customers.

Social media is meant for connecting with others. Sharing photos from your last food truck event, updating your customers about a new employee, and posting your next location. That’s the kind of stuff your customers want to see, not your opinion of something happening in national politics.

Why Food Truck Owners Should Keep Personal Political Views Off Social Media

  • You could lose customers. It’s not your food truck business’ opinion, it’s your opinion, right? Not even close. If a customer feels strongly about a political issue and you go on Facebook and post something totally derogatory or counter to what they believe, they might take a different view of you AND your food truck.
  • It’s a waste of your time. You’re not going to change someone’s political beliefs on social media. You can debate all day long, but you’re just wasting your valuable time. People are different and believe different things. Accept it, agree to disagree and move on.
  • It’s the wrong place. If you’re determined to spend valuable time arguing over political issues online, go to a political blog or a news site to discuss politics. Don’t ruin a prospective customer’s experience on social media with your rants.
  • It can affect your employees. You may have a strong political belief that differs from that of your employees or prospective employees. This may affect your ability to hire and retain the best people, who may see your political thoughts as a personal attack; even when it isn’t.
  • Your message could be misinterpreted. Given the reading comprehension skills of the average Internet user, it is likely that what you publish on social media could be misinterpreted, misunderstood and somehow read in a way that you didn’t intend.

The Bottom Line

If you’re marketing your food truck on social media, you never want to discuss your thoughts on national political views on social media, unless it actually relates directly to the food truck industry. Simply stated, keep your personla political views off social media

The lesson for food truck owners? Bringing up politics on social media is like using jalapenos or truffles in a dish. Plan their use with care, be thoughtful in the execution, and remember that a little bit can go a very long way.

I know there are a lot of people who are going to disagree with me. And to be honest, that’s fine. I am a big supporter of the concept of free speech, and of people being allowed to say and do things that I disagree with. The problem is many people online don’t.

When you have a strong feeling about politics, weigh the risks and rewards of sharing those feelings carefully before you do so. You represent your food truck business, employees and your customers, and your posts can affect them.

Do you have any additional reasons food truck owners should keep their personal political views off social media? Share your thoughts on this topic in the comment section or social media. Facebook | Twitter

2017-03-31T08:40:04+00:00 By |Business, Features|

About the Author:

Richard is an architect by degree (Lawrence Technological University, Southfield, Michigan) who began his career in real estate development and architectural planning. In September of 2010 he created Mobile Cuisine Magazine to fill an information void he found when he began researching how to start a mobile hotdog cart in Chicago. Richard found that there was no central repository of mobile street food information anywhere on the internet, and with that, the idea for MCM was born.

Leave A Comment